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Travel to the Center of the World  Ecuador possesses great ethnic, racial and linguistic diversity. It is populated by more than twelve indigenous peoples. In addition, Ecuador is one of the most bio-diverse territories on earth.
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Let Loose  When times are tough sometimes all you need is to crank up the volume, move your feet, and let the good times roll. Let loose and have fun with Aurora Photos.
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Time to Play  Aurora Photos takes you on the wild adventures of kids being kids.
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Core BMX  Even after fracturing his skull during a BMX stunt gone awry, Aurora contributing photographer, Fat Tony continues to live, breathe and creatively document BMX culture in the heart of Los Angeles.
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Comic Con  While Friday's weather was below freezing on the first day of New York Comic-Con 2009, over 77,000 fans came out in force to check out the comics, celebrities, movies and video game demos that weekend. Growing steadily with each passing year, Comic-Cons can know be found across the country. Aurora photographer Tom Sperduto set up a portable studio near the bathroom in the Jacob Javits Center and photographed portraits of as many interesting costumed characters as they could throughout the day.
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Portraits of the Tarahumara  The Tarahumara, who live in and above the canyons of northern Mexico's Sierra Madre Occidental, evaded Spanish conquerors in the sixteenth century. But can they survive the onslaught of modernity? Fast food, tourism and the modern world is at their door.
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The Island Kingdom of Norway  The Lofoten Islands are the archipelago to the west in the ocean, north of the Arctic Circle. Lofoten is known for excellent fishing and nature attractions, and small villages off the beaten track.
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PsychomagicTherapy  Aurora photographer, Alex Cipollini, was interested in spiritual therapies in Europe. In particular, he was fascinated with a particular kind called Psychomagic therapy. This is relatively a new therapy mixing traditional beliefs with modern psychotherapy, quite well-known in Europe, but not so much in the US. It aims to heal psychological wounds suffered in life.
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National Parks  From deserts to canyons, woodlands to coastlands, America's National Parks have it all. Discover our diverse collection of some of the most breathtaking preserved lands in the world.
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Spring Outdoors  It's OK to jump for joy, we are excited too. Spring in near. Think green, dream fresh and gear up for a new season outdoors with Aurora Photos.
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Enrique's Playground  Enrique 5, was born into a world of poverty. He spends his day playing with his friends in the rubbish tip and swimming in the polluted Pasig river. Although his family wish to discourage him, he works in thick toxic smoke, dragging soggy scraps of wood to burn and help his father create charcoal. He also scavenges for bits of scrap metal to earn a few pesos to help pay for his schooling and food for his family.
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The Pomaks of Bulgaria  The inhabitants of the village of Ribnovo are Bulgarian-speaking Muslims, sometimes referred to as 'Pomaks' or 'people who have suffered'. Muslim Bulgarians are descendants of Christian Bulgarians who have converted to Islam, during the 14th, 16th and the 18th century.
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Introducing Invision  Invision Images is a photo agency founded in 2006, based in Athens, Greece. Working with a team of photographers their aim is to promote new forms of photojournalism and documentary photography.
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Comic Book Heros  Some people love their comic book heros so much......Check out portraits of comic book fans dressed as their favorite comic book characters as photographed at Comic Con at the Jacob Javits Center in New York City.
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Living in the Shadows  Everyday thousands of sub-Saharan Africans try to enter Europe by crossing the divide that separates the two continents. Those that make it to Spain are customarily detained while the Spanish authorities attempt to determine their age and nationality.
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Unpredictable Future   In the heart of America where agriculture once helped drive the economy, farming has become a fading way of life. Along the foothills of Appalachia in Southeastern Ohio, aging farmers struggle to keep their farms afloat in order to provide for their families and communities. The recent economic downturn has made life more difficult for a dying breed of farmers to survive, but has increased the importance of self-sustainability in the communities that rely on this resource.
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Rodeo Montubio  Every year on October 12, the people gather for a classic Rodeo Montubio in the dusty village of Salitre, Ecuador. During the fiesta men fire their guns in the air after a good performance. Salitre is known as the Montubio capital of Ecuador. Montubios are mestizo cowboys in the coastal regions of Ecuador. During the rodeo groups from different haciendas come to compete and show of their "cowboy skills".
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West Michigan Pike  From the project and exhibit : Yesterday on the West Michigan Pike - A look at the scenic roadway that was the first modern continuous road between Chicago and Mackinac City, and is responsible for opening the Michigan lakeshore to automobile tourism and changing the way of life along its path.
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Enoughism  The act or practice of switching things off, buying less stuff and seeking to reconnect with the simpler pleasures of life.
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Transparency  Now, more then ever, there is a need for Transparency in today's corporate environment. We year for clarity, openness and truth. Aurora presents a creative visual gallery of images that help define the often obscured concept of Transparency.
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Winter's Best  Creative, unique and contemporary winter adventure and lifestyle photography that will lift your spirit right off the couch and drop you into the great wilderness.
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Discover Hamburg  Hamburg is the biggest port in Germany, as well as the media capital and richest city. This city is a combination of an old industrial waterfront and modern architecture.
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The Paris of South America  Buenos Aires is a vibrant, affordable city in Argentina. Along with the city's European flavor, it's residents called porteños bring a sense of passion to travelers.
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The Curse of Black Gold  Photographer, Pieter Ten Hoopen, went to Iraq to see how the global hunt for the black gold has affected the Iraqi people, as it is now widely acknowledged that oil was one of the reasons for the 2003 invasion. While oil pirates and corrupt officials have become wealthy, civilians have been hit with chronic cancer and killings of loved ones by oil smugglers.
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Everest: Another World  Mount Everest, the mother of all mountains, has long been the ultimate dream for adventurers. 3,000 people have reached the summit to date and nearly 300 people have perished in their attempt to get there. Climbing Everest is a humbling journey into a place where one would almost feel like he was on the moon.
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A Special Mountain: Kinabalu  Mount Kinabalu, well-known for its tremendous botanical and biological biodiversity, rises from the rain forest as a special mountain. With high levels of endemism species it is richest place in the world for the insectivorous pitcher plants, five of the thirteen are found nowhere else on earth.
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Out West  Photographer, Christian Lutz, captures the life of cattle-breeders and cowboys in Oregon. The story focuses on the relationship between man and nature.
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Explore the Island of Crete  Crete is one of the largest Greek islands. Tourists come in pursuit of it's natural beauty and unique landscape.
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Munich Beer Festival  Munich's first ever 'Oktoberfest' was held in 1810 to celebrate a royal wedding with horse races and various culinary delights. The culinary delights, primarily the beer, were much more popular than the wedding ceremony and horse races. Since then, the munich beer festival has been repeated on an almost annual basis.
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Bride of the Sea  Discover the meandering city of Venice, Italy from it's labyrinth of canals to it's exquisite architecture.
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Texas Water Safari  The Texas Water Safari, considered the "World's Toughest Boat Race", is a race down the waterways from San Marcos to Seadrift, Texas. The Texas Water Safari has the requirement of only using boats powered by human muscle.
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Rhea Anna  Rhea Anna searches for the moments in between that reveal the core essence of the subject she is interacting with and photographing.
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North Korea Today  Kim Jong-Il’s regime is waiting for President Barack Obama’s administration to make its first move. How will the U.S. handle relations with North Korea? This amid reports that North Korea is readying a test of a long-range missile powerful enough to hit the U.S. Is the ball is in America's court?
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German Technology  Photographer Thomas Ernsting shot these award winning images covering technology and engineering in Germany. Home to many famous engineers, Germany has made major accomplishments in science and technology which are important to their country’s economy and the rest of the world.
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Hotel From A Frozen River  Ten thousand years ago, glaciers created the Torne River. Since then, the crystal-clear, pure water of the Torne River has flowed freely through Lapland out to the sea. The entire ICE HOTEL is on loan from the mighty Torne River. When the spring comes and then finally the summer, the entire creation once again become part of the rushing rapids.
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The Ozark Highlands  Aurora photographer, Peter Essick, captures the most remote and scenic portions the Ozark Highlands Trail surrounding the Ozark Mountains.
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Mt. Baker Backcountry  The Mount Baker ski area is renowned for its heavy snowfall and great snowboarding, but the Mount Baker backcountry offers the off-piste snowslider far more varied choices in terrain and a vastly extended season. The term Mount Baker backcountry is usually taken to mean the large area extending from Mount Shuksan on the east to Mount Baker on the west, including the connecting ridges of Shuksan Arm and Ptarmigan Ridge in between.
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Unlikely Cabaret  Cairo offers plenty of action. From cruises on the Nile to cafés and clubs of all types it's the city that never sleeps. Remember the Egyptian saying: “Once you drink from the Nile, you will always come back.”
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New Foundland  For centuries, the cod industry sustained a way of life that came to define Canada's most eastern province. Today, with few alternatives, many are being forced to seek work in far away places like Ontario and Alberta, a trend reflected in census statistics. As the population leaves home and family behind in search of opportunity, the out-port communities and the culture that surrounds them quickly erodes.
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44th President, 44 Photographs  Inauguration day was documented across the country by a select group of Aurora photographers. This set represents some of the best work from a project comprised of over 400 images.
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Contrasting View  Checking out rifles and guns on inauguration day was the contrast to celebration for some Americans who see the new administration as a threat to their way of life.
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Young Democrat Party, California  Elyse Butler went to a Young Democrats Inauguration party (everyone from ages 18- 35) in San Diego at the W hotel and caught the spirit of the younger generation of voters happily mingling at this huge Inauguration bash.
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A Family Apart  U.S. Army Staff Sergeant Carmelo Purneda is based in Paktika province, Afghanistan. His wife and two kids are back home in Clarksville, Tennessee, waiting for him to come home. Aurora Photographers Rafal Gerszak and Trevor Clark photographed the family on opposite sides of the world on a day, the family hopes, that will bring the change needed to get Carmelo home.
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Homeless in San Francisco  Homelessness and poverty in the Tenderloin District (TL) of San Francisco is extremely high. About 6.000 people living on the street in San Francisco many in the TL. The level of poverty is just as high. With an incoming Obama administration hope is on the horizon.
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100% Solar  A 12 kilowatt solar array for Moab Public Radio makes this station the first 100 percent solar-powered radio station in Utah. In addition, Moab was the first EPA Green Community in the nation.
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Los Angeles Reacts  On the other side of the nation in Los Angeles, California, the Inauguration of President Barack Obama was watched in open areas near the Staples Center.
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Obama Supporter Rejoices  Exuberance was the order of the day across many places in America. At Nectar's Restaurant in Burlington, Vermont a scene was played out like thousands of such rally's around the country during this 2009 historic inauguration.
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The Heart of America  Deep in the heart of America is where it hurts the most. It's where people spend inauguration day in places like Ali's Bar in Glouster, Ohio. Ali's was once a thriving bar in this blue-collar town, but the economic has its owners planning to close the bar by month's end.
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Inauguration Parade  The sights and sounds of the parade route, including a glimpse of Sasha Obama in the President's limo!
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True Americana  The first town to close the polls on election night is Dixville Notch, New Hampshire, where Barack Obama won in a 15-6 tally. All 21 of Dixville's registered voters participated in the election. Obama's victory marks only the second time the town has voted Democratic, the other time being for Hubert Humphrey over Richard Nixon in 1968.
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Reactions of Hope, Washington D.C.  Jamie Rose photographed businesses all over the metro area and the inauguration anticipation of their patrons.
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Agriculture In America  At a farm leased by Nash's Organic Produce, Kia Armstrong, a 28 year old manager at the farm, believes the new Obama administration must do a better job of bring consumers back to local farmers. She says, 'Obama's election is a sigh of relief, but we must stay realistic about the fact that things aren't going to change quickly.'
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Amer-I-Can Foundation  The Amer-I-Can Foundation for Social Change is a non-profit organization created to offer social support and services to under-served populations and cities. Its 60 to 90 hour, 15 chapter Life Management Skills curriculum is designed to empower individuals to take charge of their lives, embodying President Obama's message of personal responsibility. Robert Benson photographed some of these individuals.
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Harnessing the Wind  Northern Power of Barre, Vermont builds wind turbine units meant for commercial and residential on-site power generation. With alternative energy sources a big issue on newly inaugurated President Barack Obama's agenda, sales for companies such as Northern Power should be a bright spot for the economy.
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Subway to Inauguration, Washington D.C.  The Metro subway riders waited for up to an hour or more at certain stations to ride the trains to and from Barack Obama's Inauguration Ceremonies. Jamie Rose photographed the craziness of the crowds.
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Heading to the Nation's Capital, Washington D.C.  Michael Bonfigli captures people on their journey to see the inauguration.
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Swearing In, Washington D.C.  Michael Bonfigli captures the emotion in the air as Barack Obama is sworn in as President.
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The Mexican Border  Immigration will continue to be a topic of the new administration. On inauguration day, undocumented immigrants are returned to Mexico after being detained in San Diego, California. Forty seven migrants were apprehended during the morning hours and deported back to Mexico with only their belongings in paper bags.
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Healthcare in Florida  Health care was one of the hottest issues of the election. Now Barack Obama will get his opportunity to put his plan in motion. Aurora photographer, Rhea Anna, visited the Children's Diagnostic and Treatment Center in Ft. Lauderdale.
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The Spirit of the Day  Aurora photographer, Clay McLachlan, captured the spirit of Inauguration Day from the quiet of the day's pre-dawn beginnings to the excitement of the day's main event.
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Faces of Hope, Georgia  Aurora photographer, Andrew Kornylak, shot portraits in a barber shop in East Atlanta. The portraits and quotes of each person shed light on the hope that they have with President Obama.
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Chicago's South Side, Illinois  Obama’s political career began in his mid-20s in the South Side of Chicago, the same place that gave rise to other African American political leaders such as Harold Washington and the Reverend Jesse Jackson. Who will the future leaders be?
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National Mall, Washington D.C.  Logan Mock-Bunting captures the wide range of emotions of the onlookers at the National Mall.
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Housing Crisis, California  Sales of existing houses dropped dramatically in the past year. Aurora Photographer Matt Mallam explores the changes in the California housing market and looks at the challenges facing homeowners, potential buyers, and real estate professionals.
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Wall Street, NYC  For the New York Stock Exchange, 2008 has been a roller coaster year. What will the mood be on the trading floor as Obama takes the oath of office? Aurora Photographer, Katja Heinemann, on the floor to capture the mood in the market.
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On the Mall, Washington D.C.  Aurora photographer, Ryan Donnell, captured the atmosphere at the National Mall.
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Transalpine Race  The Transalpine Race is a rugged 150 mile endurance race in the Alps between Germany and Austria.
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Today's Maya  The Maya civilization is a Mesoamerican civilization, noted for the only known fully developed written language of the pre-Columbian Americas, as well as its art, architecture, and mathematical and astronomical systems. Today's Maya live in the same regions of Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, El Salvador, and Honduras as their ancestors and retain many of their ancient traditions.
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The Intoxicating Land of Morocco  Morocco, located on the Northwest coast of Africa, is a country rich in natural beauty and stunning places. From the breathtaking landscapes of the Sahara desert and Atlas mountains to the ancient medinas filled with spice and craft shops, Morocco is a magical travel destination for all of your senses.
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The Melting Village of Kivalina  There is growing evidence that the small and impoverished Alaskan village of Kivlina is melting into the sea due to global warming. In February 2008, the village began taking action against some of the world's largest greenhouse gas offenders.
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Anita Conti's World  In the 1950's, Anita Conti spent many fishing seasons aboard French Newfoundland bound trawlers over cod fisheries. She captured and described this floating world in amazing photographs.
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Featuring Michael Hanson  Michael is another one of our editorial based photographers who is successfully making the transition into commercial photography. With an eye for the details that are sometimes left unseen, Michael captures both single powerful frames as well as complete stories crossing many genres.
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Featuring Ryan Donnell  Ryan brings strong story telling roots to the table whether approaching editorial or commercial photography. He is a fantastic illustration of the type of photographer Aurora Photos seeks to represent. Visually sophisticated, unique and compelling.
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Climbing  Carlos Hernandez offers up a a new spin on the sport of climbing. From towering rock faces above the sea to urban architecture, Carlos creates images that are powerful, surreal and well beyond the average.
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Doha Booming  Who knows Doha? The capital of Qatar is exploding and reaching the same proportions of Dubai's growth as a city.
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Pakistan Cadet College  Pakistan is a troubled country at the center of international interests. It's military is now in the spotlight as Pakistan plays a pivotal role in the "War on Terror". Pakistan's Cadet Colleges are the grounds where children begin their education to become future soldiers and officers.
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Harar: Jewel of the Horn of Africa  Harar is an Islamic city situated in the mostly Christian country of Ethiopia. Photographer, Pascal Meunier, captured the unique surroundings of Harar.
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Introducing Chico Sanchez  Mexico based photographer, Chico Sanchez, brings his passion for photojournalism and eye for unique stories to Aurora. From his travels in Spain to the cities of Mexico, Chico captures the spirit of his subjects.
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New Mexico: Land Of Enchantment  Aurora photographers capture New Mexico from it powdery white ski ranges to the the white sands of New Mexico's White Sands National Monument.
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Venezuela Elections  Venezuelans held pivotal elections that politically empowered the opposition movement against leftist President Hugo Chavez and his Socialist revolution on Sunday, Nov 23, 2008. Elections were held across the country for 22 of the 23 state governorships, 328 mayors and 233 state legislators. Aurora photographer, Meridith Kohut, captured some of the moments during the elections.
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Mentawai Islands  Agence Vu photographer,Juan Manuel Castro Prieto, traveled to Mentawai. The Mentawai archipelago is a group of four small islands located approximately 150 kms from the west coast of Sumatra. This isolated land hosts a native Malay population and is a noted destination for surfing.
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Discover the Aloha State  The natural beauty of the islands draws in millions of tourists to Hawaii. From rainforests and hiking trails to it's surfing beaches, Hawaii has something to offer everyone.
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Cabin Fever  As the winter season approaches, cabins are a cozy retreat away from the rest of the world. Various Aurora photographers show you cabins across the globe.
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Featuring Marc Adamus  Marc has the special ability to create magical, sometime surreal, images that bring the viewer into phenomenal scenes in nature.
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Patterns of Life  An variety of patterns, shapes, and abstracts of everyday life that inspire us to look at the details and nuances closer then we normally would.
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Harvest Time  Experience an array of taste and colorful harvests from around the world.
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A Different View of a Desert  Rodrigo Gomez-Rovira looks at the Atacama Desert,a virtually rainless plateau in South America, and captures a different view.
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Climate refugees  Bangladesh, which has 140 million people packed into an area a little smaller than the state of Illinois, is one of the most vulnerable targets of climate change. In the last 10 years, farmers have had to move their homes to escape the encroaching waters of the huge Brahmaputra River in Kurigram, Once happy villagers today they have turned into mere'Climate Refugees'.
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The Heirs of Genghis Khan  Photographer Jens Rötzsch visited Mongolia, and shows with his images, a country at the crossroad between traditional nomadic life and western modernity.
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Outdoor Engagement  Fresh, innovative and creative is what defines our Outdoor Collection. We continue to surpass the rest in this highly regarded and expanding body of work.
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Fresh Creative Photography  Here's a glance at a new assortment of creative imagery which is part of a growing collection at Aurora Photos.
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Race to the White House  The 2008 U.S. Presidential election will take place on November 4, 2008. As the world watches, the race for president heats up between Democratic nominee, Barack Obama, and Republican nominee, John McCain.
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Travel to the Roof of the World  The magical land of Nepal has captured many Westerners' imaginations. From it's scenic beauty along the Himalayas to it's sacred sites, this country is experiencing a surge in tourism. Aurora photographer, David Stubbs, captures the spirit of Nepal.
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The Earnhardt Legacy  Jeffrey Earnhardt, 18, is the grandson of the late NASCAR legend Dale Earnhardt. Aurora photographer, Andy Cutraro, documents Jeffrey following in the footsteps of his grandfather.
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Sex Workers in Bangladesh  It is generally estimated that there are around 20,000 -30,000 female sex workers working through brothels in Bangladesh. Photographer, G.M.B Akash, captures the daily life of these women.
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A New Perspective on China  Vu photographer, Aniu, captures dynamic aerials of highways in China. The photographer's images transform from simple traffic shots to interesting shapes and forms.
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Discover Slovenia  Formerly a part of Yugoslavia, Slovenia is a European gem for people traveling on a budget. Various photographers capture this Central European country that is becoming popular with tourists.
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Explore Iceland: the Land of Fire and Ice  Iceland is quickly becoming one of Europe's hottest travel spots. From it's breathtaking glaciers to it's enchanting hot springs, Iceland offers a unique experience. Various Aurora photographers capture the essence of Iceland through shooting the country's natural features.
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The Rez - Home of the Lakota Nation  Aurora photographer Svetlana Bahchevanova explores the contrast and psychological conflict between the reclaimed cultural and spiritual identify of the Lakota Sioux and the poverty and deprivation of life on the Rez, as it is familiarly known to its residents .
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Hemis Photo Collection  Hemis photos is the largest collection of stock images of France and is recognized for its outstanding travel pictures for editorial and advertising use. The Hemis photo collection at Aurora Photos is your source for creative travel imagery.
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Myanmar Behind Closed Doors  From political oppression to the aftermath of a cyclone, Myanmar (formerly Burma) is a country struggling to find it's freedom. Various Aurora photographers capture Myanmar's amazing culture and beauty behind it's closed doors.
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Be A World Traveler  From Gdansk, Poland to China's, Gobi Desert the photographers of our partner agency, Bilderberg, take you there. Visit Aurora Photos for a global journey.
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Dubai: Flourishing Sports Mecca  Dubai is emerging as a center of interest in the world for sports. Emirati billionaires pursue their quest to provide the biggest and best of everything from golf courses watered by 2,256 sprinklers to one of the world's largest indoor ski resorts.
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Portugal: the West Coast of Europe  Portugal is one of the oldest countries in the world, but quickly growing as a new cultural hot spot. Aurora photographers give you a glimpse of what this country has to offer.
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Featuring Andrew Kornylak  Aurora is proud to present the adventure photography of Andrew Kornylak. Although diverse in his photography talents, adventure has been a long standing passion and focus.
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Extraordinary, Agence VU  Aurora Photos proudly represent a most exceptional photo agency, Agence Vu of Paris, France. It's photographers stand out with their unique vision. See for yourself.
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Self-Mutilation in Japan  Self-injury has become a very serious problem in Japanese high schools. VU Photographer Kosuke Okahara's images document a world of pain and suffering by many young women in Japan.
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Canada from Sea to Sea  Canada is the world's second-largest country that attracts tourism through its uniqueness. Experience Canada's extraordinary beauty through Aurora photographers' eyes.
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Featuring Eric Kiel  This week we are proud to feature the dramatic portraiture photography of Eric Kiel.
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Featuring Jay Reilly  Introducing a great mix of active lifestyle photography from Jay Reilly.
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Experience the Kingdom of Thailand  Thailand is one of the biggest tourist destinations in southeast Asia. Aurora photographers capture the essence of this ancient kingdom's natural beauty and cultural attraction.
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Carry Me Ohio  Millions of toxic electronic parts are discarded every year in the U.S. Large amounts of used electronics end up being sent to developing countries where there are poor environmental standards. Pushed to the fringes of American society are communities in Appalachia marginalized by poverty, which has forged their culture and lifestyle since the early 1900s. Aurora photographer Matt Eich documents the people in these communities.
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In the Footsteps of a Million Camels  Each year, Sudan exports a quarter million camels to Egypt. Desert nomads depend on the profitable camel trade for their livelihood. To do so, they must travel one of the most treacherous of the ancient trading routes - Darb el-Arbein, the Forty Days Road, so named because of the length of time it takes to travel from central Sudan to southern Egypt.
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Featuring Daniel Lai  Daniel Lai brings a Fine Art background to the stock photography playing field.
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Caribbean Exploration  Explore some of what the Caribbean has to offer from some of Aurora's photographers.
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Pablo Vs. Chevron  Pablo Fajardo is the lead attorney for the plaintiffs in the lawsuit against Chevron. This is possibly the largest environmental lawsuit ever filed in the world. For twenty years Texaco was responsible for recklessly disposing of crude oil and toxic waste, which leaked into the water supply of the people living in the Ecuadorian Amazon.
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Photography From Below The Surface  Go below the earth's surface and discover the incredible caving photography of Robbie Shone. This type of dedication and photography is incredibly unique. It takes a very different level of expertise and vision to bring this quality of photography back from the depths of the earth.
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Mud  Go ahead, liberate yourself and get muddy! From spas where you slather yourself with mud to taking a sloppy ride through the muck on a mountain bike, we have the grit to show.
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Kiteboarding  The adventure sport of Kiteboarding has exploded over the last few years. While harnessed to a big kite, the wind carries the rider over water or snow on a short board which can maneuvered with grace.
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Get Outdoors  Get outside and breathe some fresh air. This new collection of imagery will inspire you to stand up and move your body towards the light and open air. The best of the best outdoor photography is being gathered and distributed through Aurora on a regular basis.
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Featuring Aaron Ansarov  This is an ongoing series in which Aurora will continue to develop with Aaron called The Backyard Series. Aaron captures and releases these animals, photographing them a few feet away from their natural habitat in his studio.
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The Foot Connection  Our feet are always connected to the earth and the elements that we surround ourselves with. Via this close connection with natural and unnatural materials, we are effected in an emotional way depending what lies directly beneath our feet.
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Featuring Kirk Mastin  The photography of Kirk Mastin spans over many subjects with a consistent style across the board. Working with moody lighting and not afraid of shooting in challenging locations, Kirk mixes it up to produce flavorful images that really grab the viewer.
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In A New York Minute  From outdoor films and concerts to the season's coolest events and installations, explore NYC's summer moments. Aurora photographer Katja Heinemann shares her glimpse of the NYC experience.
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China's National People's Congress  The National People’s Congress of China, which convenes annually every March, is China's greatest spectacle of communist tradition. The cavernous building is populated by countless manicured attendants ready to provide security to China's elusive leadership.
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Guatemala Mental Hospital  Aurora photographer Holly Wilmeth documented the patients of Guatemala's National Hospital for Mental Health through her striking black and white images.
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A View On Vegas  There's no place like it and some people see it like no one else. Aurora photographer, Ron Koeber captures such a view of Las Vegas.
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Last Days Of Beichuan  Beichuan is a county located at the epicenter of China's worst earthquake in 30 years. At least 80 per cent of the county is destroyed and the death toll could top 80, 000 according to the government. New Aurora photographer Chien-min Chung captured a scene of overwhelming devastation through his panoramic images.
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World Food Crisis  In the past year, prices have risen significantly for basic food on the international commodity market. Around the world, countries are feeling the effects with severe food shortages. Over the past year, rice prices have risen by 70%. The price of wheat has more than doubled. Corn and soy have been trading well above average. The global food crisis is being blamed on factors such as the growing population and emerging economies like China and India.
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The Soviet Roadside Bus-stop  n 1991 when the Soviet Union collapsed it tore down with it the infamous Iron Curtain revealing a world that was mostly unknown to the west for the better part of the century. The phenomenon of the road side bus stop shelter as works of art is a surprising revelation one may not have expected to discover in this land filled with functionality and coldness.
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Bold China  This summer the eyes of the world will be focused on China. Aurora contributing photographers have been focusing their lenses on China. Here are some of their outstanding images.
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Predator Plants  Charles Darwin considered carnivorous plants some of the most captivating living beings on earth. Carnivorous plants are plants that receive most of their nutrients from trapping and consuming animals or insects. Aurora photographers give us a closer unique look at these peculiar plants.
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Diverse New York  New York City has incredible diversity and how Aurora photographers see the Big Apple can be just as broad and quirky.
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Portraiture : Classic  Our cultures have changed, but sometime a look at retro, vintage photography can remind us of who we are. Or who we are not. Check out some of Aurora's classic portraiture.
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Introducing Thomas Backer  Thomas Backer, one of Aurora's newest contributor, brings an ethereal style to destination and people photography. Allow us to introduce his work. Enjoy.
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Disappearing Glaciers  Through a unique photographic project, Extreme Ice Survey, James Balog provides evidence of fast melting glaciers. The project records the terrifying speed of their disappearance. Balog notes: photography will provide irrefutable visual evidence of global warming.
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Life on the Streets of Hanoi  In Hanoi, Vietnam, after years being homeless, Ly Thi Mui, 34 with her son, Trun Van Pha, 5, has adapted and developed her own sense of happiness, living for her son and also living the life of a Buddhist detachment from worldly possessions.
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Valentine's Day  Valentine's Day is shrouded in mystery. Still, February is a month of romance containing both Christian and ancient Roman tradition.
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Skiing Lake Tahoe  
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Iron Roads - Olivier Renck  Iron roads, or vie ferrate, are paths through mountains aided by metal ladders and bridges, offering climbers the chance to cross terrain that would otherwise be impassable.
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Photographing Adventure  Hanging on the side of a cliff, every movement is important. All that separates a climber from plummeting down thousands of feet of sharp rocks is a few lengths of rope and a handful of sturdy clips. Every step higher into the air must be carefully thought out, because a single slip could be the beginning of a very short trip back to sea level. For some, a journey into the wild unknown is a fantasy realized only in movies. For others, it’s a way of life. Suspended several hundred feet above the next flat surface, adventure photographer Corey Rich pulls out his camera and snaps a picture. For Rich, these trips are his passion, but they’re also his job.
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Animal Relocation - Adrian Bailey  Humans have stepped in to help grazing species resume their natural migration routes, many of which have been blocked by development.
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Root Glacier - Richardson  Covering more than 13 million acres in the southeastern corner of Alaska, Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve is the largest park in the United States, six times the area of Yellowstone. Perhaps the most impressive features within the preserve are the massive glaciers that cover 25 percent of the entire park. Nearly as motionless as the surrounding mountainsides, the ancient bodies of creeping ice sit in valleys, like craggy dormant lakes of an age long past, shifting and morphing under the stresses of the weather. In the spring, the ice melts flood the rivers with runoff; in the winter, additional layers of snow are packed on top, eventually to be compacted into ice during a process called firnification.
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Heli Wrangell St Elias - Richardson  Beyond the lifts and well-worn slopes of commercial resorts lies a world of untracked powder waiting to be skied. Longer and more varied than traditional paths, these routes crisscross through age-old forests and down sudden inclines. There’s no feeling like inhaling the crisp winter air while gliding through the alpine wilderness with the open space of a distant valley seemingly at your feet. It’s like descending from heaven. Far away from the clearly marked trails of mainstream ski locations, there’s only one way to get to the top of these slopes -- by helicopter. Heli-skiing has been around since the middle of the 20th century, freeing experienced skiers to pioneer isolated sections of mountains and cut through deep, pristine snow. The adventure goes something like this: groups of people are dropped near the peak of a slope with appropriate gear and must find their way back down to sea level.
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On the Trail with Barack Obama  Join Aurora photographer Callie Shell as she covers Barack Obama on the Iowa caucus campaign trail with exclusive behind-the-scenes access shot on assignment for Time magazine.
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Guatemala  Guatemala is an enchanting land filled with beautiful colors. From ancient temples to coffee farms to fully preserved colonial cities, this country has unlimited stunning visual.
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San Francisco Travel  Home of the spectacular Golden Gate Bridge, San Francisco is for good reason one of the United States most popular travel destinations. Arts and culture go hand in had with this vibrant and alive city.
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New York City  "New York, New York, big city of dreams..."
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Aral Sea - Herwig  The Aral Sea was once the fourth largest inland body of water on the planet, but in the last century it has been all but drained, leaving areas of Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan with very few resources for survival.
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Acadia Winter-McLain  Acadia National Park may get cold in the winter, but the way the park comes alive during the chilly months makes it an intriguing place to visit and explore.
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Introducing Eric Kiel  We proudly present the wonderfully toned and creative image making of Eric Kiel. His images have a life of their own and have a fantastic range of tonality and mood. From portraits to places, Eric captures images a truly unique fashion.
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Everest  There are plenty of images out there of Everest, but nothing quite like what Aurora photographers capture. Where else can you find a game of baseball being played at basecamp or a comical view of nature calling on the big mountain.
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Think Green  There barely goes a day that we don't see or hear something about this hot topic in the media. Aurora Photographers are producing a range of imagery that speaks to "thinking green" that is quite different from the rest.
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Life at Sea  For a commercial fisherman, life at sea is a constant interaction with mother nature. At times in can be brutal work that pushes these dedicated people to their limits. This feature gives you a glimpse into what these courageous people call their office.
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Introducing Robert Benson  Robert Benson shoots many subjects in many styles. His lit images of athletes in action are highly stylized and commercially relevant. Mostly moody high-key visuals are what makes these images stand out.
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Feeling Trapped?  Aurora Photos has a truly unique offering of creative imagery for the commercial market. Take the concept "trapped" for example. This blend of illustrative imagery will surely show our offerings are far more then meets the eye.
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Water Scarcity - Essick  If people keep going through water at current rates, soon there won’t be any clean enough to reuse, which could lead to large scale conflicts over the planet’s most abundant resource.
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Tatshenshini - McLain  The British Columbian Tatshenshini-Alsek park is a tremendous preserve filled with varied forest terrain, glaciers and the surging Tatshenshini River, which provides an intimate tour of the area for travelers brave enough to take a whitewater raft down its rapids.
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Saami - Ryman  One of the oldest indigenous groups in the world, northern Europe’s Sámi are keeping their culture intact on the same pieces of land their ancestors inhabited thousands of years ago.
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Perfume - Kendrick  Scent compositions, whether they’re marketed as perfumes or added to frozen dinners to make them smell like chicken, are a huge industry that influence people more than they may realize.
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Fiji  Michael's travel photography keeps him on the road undertaking documentary projects that delve deep into indigenous cultures and social issues. This flavorful feature focuses on the people and life of a village in Fiji.
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Winter Bliss  The winter season in many ways refreshes the spirit and allows human beings to interact with their natural environment in new ways. This winter gallery is a compilation of snowy perspectives from a talented mix of aurora photographers.
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Spirit Bear - Walsh  Spirit bears, a small percentage of American black bears born with white fur, are a touchstone in Native American folklore and a mascot for British Columbia, where nearly the entire population of the animal lives.
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Portland-McLain  Portland, Maine’s largest city, combines urban excitement with small town charm to make it a great vacation spot.
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Breast Pounding - Pannecoucke  In Cameroon, a form of mutilation called breast ironing is a popular custom among parents trying to control the sexualization of their adolescent girls--despite the government classifying the practice as torture.
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Oahu Surf - Davey  Hawaii’s North Shore is Mecca for big-wave surfers, drawing in thousands of disciples every year to take part in the island of Oahu’s legendary breakers and barrels.
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Kris Pannecoucke  Kris Pannecoucke, a young Belgian photographer, works on stories of cultures and traditions across the globe. He contributes stock and is available for assignments through Aurora.
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Lucha Libre - Hasbun  Lucha Libre, a form of wrestling made popular in Mexico, is taking the world by storm with the dramatic legends of its fighters and the colorful costumes they wear
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Kumbh Mela - Pannecoucke  Every 12 years, millions of Hindu believers make the trip to four holy places in India, participating in the religion’s most sacred pilgrimage.
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Feeding the Planet - Kendrick  With the world population and individual food consumption consistently on the rise since the 1960s, farms are straining to produce enough to feed the world.
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Reinhardt - Cohen  The influence of Django Reinhardt’s guitar playing can be felt strongly within the modern music world.
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Mahouts - Wood  Elephant trainers, known as mahouts in southern Asia, continue to forge an ancient bond between men and the largest land animals, despite the impact of changing societies around them.
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Silk-Wolinsky  Silk is produced by the larvae of silkworms native to China, India and Europe. The fabric has been successfully imitated, and businesses run on the traditional method of silk production are suffering because of it.
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Whale Articulation-Walsh  Dan Dendanto takes readers through the process of whale articulation, from a live specimen to the sculpture made of hanging bones.
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African Buffalo-Bailey  The African buffalo has a unique relationship between its environment and other animals. Man’s growing presence in its once vast wilderness is a source of concern for many of Africa’s wildlife managers.
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Arlington Horsemen-Councill  After being injured during his tour of duty, Sergeant Christopher Taffoya sought to resume a quiet military life as a horseman.
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Lafayette Cajun Zydeco  The city of Lafayette’s nightlife is very much alive with the same passion that helped create Cajun and zydeco music hundreds of years ago.
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Olympics China - Bilderberg  Beijing has spent billions of dollars building extravagant new stadiums for the upcoming 2008 Olympics, which will last for two weeks next August.
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Wind Turbine-Croslin  Wind turbines are an increasingly viable source of green electricity and are on the verge of becoming a major force in the energy business.
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McLachlan - PiedmonteRegion  The Piedmont region of Italy makes an excellent travel destination for lovers of fine foods and history.
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Venezuela Spiritualism - Cipollini  The Venezuelan Cult of Maria Lionza freely mixes Catholic religious practices with spiritism and local customs to form a mysterious belief structure.
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Chile Water Vacation-Besaw  Chile’s Lake Yelcho is a great place to find peace while paddling long expanses on a sea kayak.
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White Sands - Clark  The White Sands National Monument in New Mexico is one of the strangest sights a tourist can find in the United States: 275 square miles of untouched, unexploited powdered gypsum.
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McLain - Inhuit Hunt  Many modern Inuit people still live a subsistence hunting lifestyle, in which their survival depends upon what meat they can hunt.
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Nuclear Waste-Essick  
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Chile on Horseback-Besaw  A horseback tour of Chile’s Futaleufu Valley brings the region’s expansive forests, wildlife and scenic vistas to life.
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Escalante-Austin  Take in the natural shapes and colors of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in Utah, where records of the planet’s history are written in the stones.
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Maine Winter  Winter in Maine is beautiful, but sometimes cruel, violent coastal storms, unexpected thaws and flooding as well as snow and ice. Regardless, those seem to pass and leave the winter that many Mainiacs and visitors long for.
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Hawaii's Big Island - LoScalzo  
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Guatemala's Kaibil Commandos - Wilmeth  
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Mentawai Islands - Davey  
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Hops-Bilderberg  
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Polo Players Go Big - Jonkmanns  Athletes exchange speed for spectacle as they trade in their horses for elephants in a distinctive style of polo.
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Maine's Crustacean Culture - Walsh  In Maine, the lobster continues to be an icon and a valuable piece of the state’s culture and economy.
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Afghani Dog Fights - Lo Scalzo  Since the fall of the Taliban, there has been a resurgence of dog fighting in Afghanistan.
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Kamakura Snow Festival - Essick  In the small Yokote City in Japan, the quaint Kamakura Snow Festival has brought hundreds of thousands of tourists to the town.
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Gardens for Life - Ruef  With the help of Gardens For Life, schoolchildren in the Kenya learn the three R’s while reaping the fruits of their labor.
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The Winter Road to Zanskar - Huster  Zanskar, an ancient Buddhist kingdom, is isolated from the rest of the world for most of the year. Roads are impassable during all seasons except for summer. In the winter, the Zanskar River freezes for a few weeks giving residents an opportunity to make a week-long trek to the outside world.
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Scarification - Clajot  The practice of scarification holds deep meaning for some African tribes and is a bold outlet for personal expression.
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Good Genes, Long Life - McLain  Okinawa, Japan has, per capita, the largest number of centenarians—people who live to the age of 100. Studies show good genes and healthy living help get them there.
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Galapagos Under Siege Feature  More people live on and visit the Galapagos Islands than ever before and the burden of the population is stressing parts of the ecosystem to near collapse.
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The Crash of Two Traditions - Cipollini  Mattanza, a 2,000-year-old traditional method of fishing migrating Mediterranean tuna is headed the way of the bluefin—toward extinction.
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Bride and Decadence - Pannecoucke  Weddings in India have become increasingly more extravagant affairs, with the average marriage costing $34,000-- $8,000 more than a standard wedding in the United States.
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Pollen Collectors - McLain  John Sneed has struck gold on his Missouri farm—he harvests pollen.
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My Chemical Polar Bear - Various  Polar Bears, an important food source for the Inuit people of the Arctic, have been found to contain PBDEs—a family of flame retardant that is known to cause thyroid problems and impair developing central nervous systems in laboratory animals. The European Union has banned some PBDEs while China and a few states and corporations are following suit.
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Cuba's Classic Cars  Trade embargoes with the U.S. have prevented new automotive parts from entering Cuba for 47 years, so “Fixit Men” engineer replacement pieces to keep the country’s fleet of vintage American cars running strong.
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Credit Card Truths: How Addicted Are We?  Growing credit card addiction and debt dependency in the U.S. is not just a problem for American households; it is also a concern for the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.
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Shredding The Dunes  Peruvian kids, inspired by American snowboarding videos, take to the world’s largest dunes.
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Midwest Mountaineering  Growing up in Southeast Alaska, Tim Peterson never imagined he’d be ice climbing in the Midwest, Iowa style, up the sides of a grain silo.
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Topiary Art  On March 21, 2007, Marqueyssac Park in the south of France celebrated the tenth anniversary of opening its gates to the public.
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A Contemporary Noah’s Ark  In Valencia, Spain, a five building complex called the City of Arts in Sciences houses L’Oceanografic, Europe’s largest aquarium.
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John Smith’s Chesapeake Bay  April 26, 2007 marks the 400th anniversary of John Smith’s arrival in the Chesapeake Bay, America’s largest Estuary.
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It's a Car, It's a Boat... It's an Amphicar  "Amphipoda", "The Wave", and "The Splash King" are not superheroes, but like Aquaman, these gentlemen are capable of freely operating on land and in water.
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The Faroe Islands  
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Green River Fishing  
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Nunavut Journal  
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India's Transvestites  
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Yellowstone and Gran Teton Parks in Winter  
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Shark Hunters  Shark hunting is legally practiced as an extreme sport, despite the fact that shark populations are dwindling.
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Snake Charmer  
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Maine Island Life  The popular perception is that life on an island off the coast of Maine is idyllic. David McLain's photography captures this notion.
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Sean Davey's Surfing Paradise  In his teens Sean Davey’s homeland of Tasmania fueled his passion for photography and great surf. Oahu's famed north shore has become his paradise, which he loves to share through his photography. Lose yourself in this award winning imagery.
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Maine Blueberries  Maine's state berry is the blueberry, and a thriving industry of wild and cultivated blueberries exists in the state. From pies to pancakes, and even a blueberry festival, the hype is backed by fact.
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Splash Page Main Photos  
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Malaysia  Today’s Malaysia reflects a pluralist culture based on the fusion of Malay, Chinese, Indian and indigenous cultures. In the 1980s economic reforms transform Malaysia into an Asian Tigers, but also came repression and human rights abuses. Currently, Prime Minister Abdullah Badawi, has a more statesmanlike reputation, and has made headway on reducing corruption and instituting reforms. As a a multi-ethnic, multi-cultural and multilingual society, the country looks to a bright future in which tourism has a key role.
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Focus on the World  Aurora photographers focus on the world around them. It's a world with a multitude of places, people and things.
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Kiss  It is universal, tender, passional, sweet and more, the kiss.
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Travels With Per-Andre Hoffman  Raised in Brazil and Norway, schooled in the USA and England, Per-Andre Hoffman never has stopped traveling. Today he continues to to document the world for many renowned magazines, communications ministries, and travel companies. Please, enjoy his work as much as we do at Aurora Photos.
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Iraq Today  Award winning photojournalist Ashley Gilbertson covered the Iraq war comprehensively throughout its the initial 18 months. Soon a book of that work will be published. Recently, he returned to Baghdad and came back with these images of that city today.
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Galapagos Under Siege  Ever since Charles Darwin first visited the Galapagos in 1835, the tiny archipelago 600 miles off the coast of Ecuador has captivated the world’s imagination. However, increased tourist traffic and population growth have put a huge stress on the islands’ ecological balance. Invasive non-native plants and animals are feeding on or forcing out rare native species and the heavy impact of the human footprint is often hidden out of view. Aurora photographer shows a place that is at once beautiful, magical and under siege.
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Our Toxic World  Chemicals are all around us. Their applications endless: flame retardant clothes, air fresheners, perfumes, more vibrant colors. All this convenience comes at what cost? Aurora photographer Peter Essick examines the toll that chemicals take on our bodies and minds.
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Introducing Mario Colonel  Specializing in mountain photography, both as a professional photographer as well as a professional mountaineer, Mario Colonel has been living in Chamonix for the past 20 years. Vagabond of the mountaintops, he has trekked to the four corners of the word, with expeditions in the Himalayas, Patagonia, Canada and Bolivia.
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Scarification In Benin  In Djougou, central Benin, scarifications pass from generation to generation, with a boy carrying the same marks as his father. The scarification ceremony itself is of great social importance, as it represents the passage into adulthood.
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The Historic Photography of Tom Frost  Photographer and filmmaker Glen Denny said of Frost and his photography: "Most of the climbing photos you see now are prearranged setups for the camera on much-traveled routes. The impressive thing about Frost is that his classic images were seen, and photographed, during major first ascents. In those awesome situations he led, cleaned, hauled, day after day and--somehow--used his camera with the acuity of a Cartier-Bresson strolling about a piazza. Extremes of heat and cold, storm and high altitude, fear and exhaustion . . . it didn't matter. He didn't seem to feel the pressure." Aurora is very proud to introduce this historic work on our site.
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Tragedy at Virginia Tech  Virgina Tech University was devastated after a student went on a deadly shooting spree on Monday, April 16. Aurora photographer Jay L. Clendenin photographed the campus as students and faculty react, mourn and begin to cope with the tragic loss of life.
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Harar Jugol  From hyena man, who feeds hyenas on the outskirts of the town every night, to its 82 mosques, three of which date from the 10th Century, its no wonder that the Ethiopian historic town, Harar Jugol, has been listed as a world heritage site by the United Nations.
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Balog's Trees  Jame Balog spent six-year photographing America’s great trees, forcing us to reconsider how we perceive and photograph nature. There are 92 portraits of trees, all of them the largest, oldest, strongest individuals of their species in America. Many are globally superlative as well. Coupling rock climbing and caving techniques with digital cameras, Balog ventured to extremes, dangling 36 stories above the earth to produce unprecedented views of the natural world.
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Introducing Hemis  Aurora Photos now represents some of the best travel images from Hemis, a French stock agency specializing in travel photography. This is a selection from around the world. Look for a selection of French travel images coming soon.
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The Photography of Ulf Boettcher  Ulf Böttcher's photographs have been published in more than 80 books. He freelances out of Germany in both press photography and studio work, as well as in the advertising world. Ulf lives in Potsdam and is part of Bilderberg Archiv der Fotografen, represented in North America by Aurora Photos.
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India's Kumbh Mela  Men, women and children bathe in the waters of Sangam in India during a cycle of pilgrimage known as the Kumbh Mela when millions of Hindus visit four cities on a 12-yearly cycle to expunge their sins by bathing in especially holy stretches of the Ganges and its tributaries in the belief that a ritual dip would wash away all sins. The biggest days of the Kumbh Mela festival are January 19 (Mauni Amavasya), when about 20-25 million are expected to converge for this spectacle of spirituality, devotion and stoicism.
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The Faces of Colombia  When you mention Colombia these days, most people imagine a lawless country overrun with guerillas and narcotics traffickers: The land of Pablo Escobar, car bombs in the streets of Bogota, a place where you might get kidnapped at any moment. While Colombia still has serious problems, the reality of the place is a far cry from the dismal stereotypes, and public safety has increased greatly in recent years. In an effort to present a more complex view of a country he has grown to love, Aurora photographer Dennis Drenner spent three years working on a series of portraits shot all over the country. The series aims to reflect Colombia’s great ethnic diversity and social structure, the nightmares of its past and its hopes for the future.
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A Passion for Snowboarding  Few photographers have this kind of passion for a sport. Introducing Jeff Curtes.
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Spa Craze  Yes, spa means more than just a massage now. The spa craze means that there are a lot of different treatments that will appeal to a lot of different people. Today, spas have become a more widely accepted recreation activity and very popular with both genders and with every age range of traveler. Check out the work of Aurora’s Matthew Wakem and his recent spa photography.
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The Netherlands, a.k.a. Holland  A densely populated and geographically low-lying country, about half of its surface area is less than 1 metre (3.3 ft) above sea level and much of it is actually below sea level, The Netherlands is popularly known for its windmills, cheese, wooden shoes, dikes, flowers, dunes, bicycles and social tolerance. Come explore a country most call Holland.
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Italy's Castelluccio Lentils  Castelluccio lentils are famous for their delicate taste and for their tiny size: around 2 mm. The Castelluccio plain, set against the backdrop of the mysterious Sibillini Mountains, takes on a fantastic appearance during late Spring. Thanks to the blossoming of the lentil fields the valley becomes an immense, shimmering display of color. Lentils are believed to have originated in central Asia, having been consumed since prehistoric times. They are one of the first foods to have ever been cultivated. Lentil seeds dating back 8000 years have been found at archeological sites in the Middle East.
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Classic Ireland  After an amazing economic turn-around, Ireland today is second richest country in the European Union, but classic Ireland remains. It is a land of green country and majestic seaside cliffs and rich in history, legend and character.
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Chavez's Venezuela  There's a new kind of revolution emerging in Latin America, and its most successful manifestation has been Venezuela’s Hugo Chavez and his Bolivarian movement. Chavez’s progressive policies are affecting political and economic thinking around the world and presenting the U.S. with a burgeoning foreign policy crisis. Aurora's Andrew Cutraro takes a closer look at how Chavez's policies have affected the political, economic and social situation on the ground in Venezuela, and brings a unique perspective of a country coming into its own on the world stage.
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The Winter Road to Zanskar  The old Buddhist kingdom of Zanskar quietly sits in a remote valley in the Indian Himalaya, near the border of Pakistan. Only during summer does a dirt road connect Zanskar to the rest of the world. The remainder of the year, the region remains cut-off, but for a couple of winter months when the temperature drops enough for the Zanskar River to freeze and “Chadhar” to come to life. Chadhar is this vital section of the River that flows from Zanskar into the Indus River and allows walkers to rejoin the highway connecting Leh, the capital of Ladakh to Kargil and the West. The week-long journey remains a traditional route used by all who must travel during the winter months. The Indian army’s Border Roads Organization (BRO) is building a road in the Zanskar river gorge, which will quickly and safely link Zanskar’s capital Padum to Leh. While everybody in Zanskar wants the road, they also know it will change their culture and traditions forever.
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Robb Kendrick's Tintypes  In the past few years, Robb Kendrick has traveled to 76 countries and all seven continents. Kendrick works for National Geographic, Sports Illustrated and Smithsonian. But Kendrick's true passion has become wet plate photography on tin, known as tintype.
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St. Lucia  First visited by Europeans in about the year 1500 and colonized successfully by France St. Lucia is the sort of island that Caribbean travelers dream about, small, lush, tropical and relatively unknown.
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The Next Democratic Hopeful?  Barack Obama with his eloquent keynote address at the 2004 Democratic National Convention confirmed his status as one of the Democratic party's freshest and most inspirational new leaders. Will he be the next Democratic hopeful?
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Creepy Crawly Things  What insects do we find in art? What insects affect us psychologically? Can you think of any song, book or movie based on insects? Perhaps you've experienced entomophobia (fear of insects). You might have heard Flight of The Bumblebee, read 'Metamorphosis,' or seen 'The Fly.' The Egyptian's deified the scarab beetle and the ancient Greek cult of Artemis worshipped the bee. Some Scientist think that 10% of the animal biomass of the world is ants, another 10% is composed of Termites. That's an incredible 20% of the total animal biomass of the planet. Insects are everywhere and have become a part of almost every facet of the humanities.
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A Different Kenyan School  Boys and girls at Nyandarva boarding primary school work in a large agricultural garden, organized by "Gardens for Life". This initiative seeks to embed the most fundamental of issues, food and nutrition, within the education curriculum by maximizing the use of school gardens and as a source of income for the school. After feeding the students, the foodstuff produced can be sold locally.
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Five Years Later: Remembering 9/11  Five years after September 11, 2001, Aurora looks back on that terrible day and the days following when New York and the country pulled together to remember the fallen.
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At the Lebanon Border  As the latest chapter of violence and crisis in the Middle East continues to escalate, Aurora Photographer David Blumenfeld has been at the Lebanese border in Northern Israel photographing the Israeli Defense Force military campaign and the towns where Hezbollah rockets and mortars have been exploding.
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Yoga  Slow down and take some time for yourself. Visually enjoy keywords such as "quiet", "still", "vitality" and of course "health". Yoga is on a vertical growth curve, Aurora's Outdoor Collection demonstrates why.
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Sailing  This groups favorite natural resource is wind power. Cruising, racing and the lifestyle of living on a boat is all available at Aurora Photos.
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Introducing Ty Milford  Ty Milford's eye understands perfectly the concept of fun. His lifestyle images demonstrate his ability to see what we all want to feel; playfullness, quirky and joy.
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The Outdoor Woman  She is fit, healthy and tan. She has deep laugh lines. Her shoe collection has no heels, it does have mud, sand and sticky rubber associated with it. Her partner desperately tries to keep up.
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Creative Outdoors  Aurora Photos outdoor photographers come in all varieties. Whether it be hanging thousands of feet off the ground, waiting in the tube for the surfer to drop in or maxing out following a professional endurance athlete, Aurora's shooters still manage to apply their creative skills to get the commercial image.
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Gone Fishing  Fishing is about more than the catch. It is the life that surrounds the experience; standing in a cold river at sunrise, studying the hatch, listening to the river, and of course watching for the dashing figures beneath the surface of the water. And then the tug on the line. These are the experiences we long for. Aurora Photos photographers have provided all of these experiences in their imagery, now they are available through Aurora's Outdoor Collection.
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Chicago: On the Street  In 2000, Aurora photographer Kevin Horan took to the streets of Chicago with an 8x10-format Deardorf camera. In 10 locations across the city, he set up his camera and photographed willing pedestrians on a plain white backdrop, illuminated only by sunlight. What resulted is "Street Census," a project about people watching; each image, in the photographers words, depicting "the walking expression of [a person's] whole life story."
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Masks of Spain  Masks appear the world over in social and religious celebrations and rituals. They serve as storytelling aids and as portals to the spirits of animals, gods, and the dead. In Spain, masks are an especially vivid part of traditional culture. They appear in festivals and during carnival; often manifesting a combination of Christian and indigenous tradition. Aurora brings you exceptional images from Spain, representing the vibrancy and diversity of Spanish masks.
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Festivals  Across the world, festivals - communal celebrations of harvests, history, culture, religion, and entertainment – bring us together in revelry and remembrance. They become events of human interaction punctuated by colorful clothing, lights, dance, food, and music. Aurora Photos has some of the best and most interesting images from festivals around the world. Take a look.
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Earthquake Science  We know earthquakes level cities and kill people. In December 2004, a giant earthquake caused a tsunami that killed over 220,000 people. In Kashmir last October, a magnitude 7.6 quake claimed 73,000 lives. In cities across the globe, city planners, scientists, and emergency rescue services are studying earthquakes and preparing for the fallout of the next big quake. Aurora photographer Peter Essick traveled the globe, documenting the cities most at risk, and following scientists in their quest to better understand earthquakes. These are some of his images.
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Does it bring more than oil?  One of the biggest engineering projects of the decade, the Baku-Tbili-Ceyhan (BTC) pipeline was expected to benefit the economies and inhabitants of Turkey, Georgia, and Azerbaijan. Running east-west from Baku, Azerbaijan on the Caspian Sea, through Tbilisi, Georgia and finally to Ceyhan, Turkey on the Mediterranean; the BTC transmits oil to points in Europe and across the world. Despite this, however, the standard of living in these countries remains low, and the pipeline brings new environmental and physical dangers. Now, with construction on new natural gas and oil pipelines underway, the region has become a region of great strategic significance, often, to the detriment of its inhabitants. "
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Timor Unrest  East Timor's president threatened to resign Thursday after the country's beleaguered prime minister refused to step down, deepening a political crisis following weeks of bloody street battles. In addition, tens of thousands of people displaced by the recent unrest in Timor Leste, both in the countryside as well as thousands who stayed at home in the capital, Dili, are in urgent need of food aid, according to assessments by WFP and its partners.
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Introducing Anders Ryman  Anthropologist, photographer, and writer, Anders Ryman put them all together and focuses his camera on travel and traditional cultures around the world. His work shows a deep understanding and appreciation for people and cultures, whether he is photographing the Hait Haddidou in the High Atlas of Morocco or Uru Murato Indians in Bolivia’s Altiplano. Based in Sweden, Anders consistently brings back compelling images and stories from all corners of the globe.
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Birds  • There are more than 9,000 different species of birds in the world. • Peregrine Falcons have been estimated to reach speeds between 100 and 200 mph. • There are more than 9,000 different species of birds in the world. • Most migrating birds crossing the Caribbean travel at around 10,000 feet. They may begin their nightly flights cruising around 5,000 feet then gradually climb to a top altitude around 20,000 feet. • Aurora has several pages of bird photos online.
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An Arbitrary Line between Mexico and the USA  Lo Scalzo examines the landscape of the U.S.–Mexico border, a boundary with the highest number of both legal and illegal crossings of any place on earth. Some 350 million people cross legally every year. The differences in living standards between these countries are the primary force behind the migratory flows.
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The Last Tonnara  In Sicily, the tonnare, an ancient mattanza rite and traditional tuna-fishing technique, still exists. Every year at the end of springtime, huge tuna migrate from the Atlantic ocean to the warmer Mediterranean waters. These fish, which can weigh more than 850 pounds, are captured and loaded on oared boats with only the strength of the fishermens’ arms.
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Antarctic - What's Next?  Since 1945, the Antarctic Peninsula has experienced a warming of about 4.5F (2.5C). The annual melt season has increased by 2 to 3 weeks in just the past 20 years. The 770 square mile (1,994 km2) Larsen A ice shelf disintegrated suddenly in January 1995. Measurements from data recorders in the Southern Ocean waters around Antarctica show a 0.3F (0.17C) rise in ocean temperatures between the 1950s and the 1980s. The permanent ice cover of nine lakes on Signey Island has decreased by about 45% since the 1950s. Average summer air temperature has warmed by 1.8F (1C). More data such as this exists. What’s next?
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Mexican Immigration  The US immigration Act of 1907 reorganized the states bordering Mexico into Mexican Border District to stem the flow of immigrants into the U.S. Almost 100 years later the flow continues and the issues remain. Various Aurora photographers have examined this subject visually telling human stories in the process.
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Guatemala's Kaibil Commandos  After years of secrecy Guatemala's Kaibil Operations Training Center allows Aurora photographer Holly Wilmeth to witness and document their demanding training. The goal: to develop elite commando forces. They specialise in jungle warfare tactics and counter-insurgency operations. The group claims to have shed its notorious history of massacre and human rights abuse.
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Grand Staircase-Escalante N. M.  The Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument's vast and austere landscape embraces a spectacular array of scientific and historic resources. This high, rugged, and remote region, where bold plateaus and multi-hued cliffs run for distances that defy human perspective, was the last place in the continental United States to be mapped. Even today, this unspoiled natural area remains a frontier, a quality that greatly enhances the monument's value for scientific study. The monument has a long and dignified human history: it is a place where one can see how nature shapes human endeavors in the American West, where distance and aridity have been pitted against our dreams and courage.
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John Smith's Chesapeake Bay, 400 years.  Aurora photographer Peter Essick documented Chesapeake Bay and brought back images that examine the current state of the Bay and the sites explorer John Smith gazed upon hundreds of years before. As we approach the 400-year anniversary of Smith's exploration, this work helps us understand what treasure Chesapeake Bay.
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The Oceonographic  The Oceanographic in Valencia, Spain's contains 45,000 fish, invertebrates and marine mammals, representing 500 species. Designed by Felix Candela, it displays in a series of sculptural structures, arranged around a huge lake, each devoted to a different sea. Europe's largest marine park is more than an sophisticated aquarium it is also a research institute.
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Aurora Rocks  While not well known for our music personalities, Aurora does have some great work. Allow us to share some of these photgraphers with you. From Bowie to Eminem, the Stones to Bob Marley, there's more than you might think.
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Northern Italy's Piemonte Region  It is easy to fall in love with northern Italy’s Piemonte, a region not yet exploited. Geographic variations and easy access to diverse activities gives the area its strength. It has mountains, hill towns, fine foods, such as white truffles, and it is home to Barolo and Barbaresco wines!
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Cape Verde  When the Portuguese arrived in 1456 Cape Verde was uninhabited. Independence came in 1975, but this small nation of islands lacks resources and has severe droughts. Most of the nation's GDP is from the services industry and it is now considered a country of average human development. Cape Verde has significant cooperation with Portugal at every level as many descendants come from white Portuguese settlers and black African slaves. More Cape Verdeans live abroad than in Cape Verde and share a culture that reflects its mixed Portuguese and African roots. It is well known for its diverse forms of music such as Morna (the Capeverdian Fado) and the urban Cape Verdian kizomba.
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One Photographer's Paris  This famous quote, “If you are lucky enough to have lived in Paris as a young man, then wherever you go for the rest of your life it stays with you, for Paris is a moveable feast,” by Ernest Hemingway could easily be linked to the photographs of Clay McLachlan.
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Why Some Live Longer  None of the centenarians smoke, but all of them eat a diet consisting mainly of fruit and vegetables, share a strong emphasis on the family, and are are deeply invested in their communities. Experts tell us it is possible to view the behaviors of the world's longest lived people as a kind of ala carte menu from which a person can choose their favorite habits from each culture and incorporate them into their lives accordingly. These mall habits and lifestyle choices can add or subtract a significant number of healthy years to one's life. The choice is up to you. Click "text" bellow on the thumbnail to read more...
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Kentucky Horse Country  Horse country is a story about how thoroughbred horses are born and raised in Kentucky creating a billion dollar industry. Although there are prestigious farms with names like Calumet, they are really horse factories churning out hundreds of racing hopefuls year after year. Over 600 farms spread throughout six counties ranging in size from a thousand acres to many thousands. This is just a small sample of the images Melissa Farlow has on this topic.
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Small Town Jamboree  High atop the Blue Ridge Mountains there is a place that transcends time and gathers old and young, to share in the harmony of music. Folks from around the world congregate in the Country Store in Floyd, Virginia to dance to the rhythm of bluegrass and old-time music that is borrowed from the surrounding hills and valleys.
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A Quiet Horseman  "A Quiet Horseman" is the story of a Purple Heart recipient and Iraq war veteran's service in the last active horse unit in the U.S. Army. The "Old Guard's Caisson Platoon" bears fallen soldiers to their graves in Arlington National Cemetery in the U.S. This story ran in the New York Times Sunday Magazine on Jan. 1, 2006.
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The Saami Culture  The Saami people living in Kautokeino, Norway celebrate weddings and other life cycle ceremonies at Easter time, after which the reindeer herders move with their herds to the Atlantic coast for summer pasture. The Saami currently live in Norway, Sweden, Russia and Finland.
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Introducing Corey Rich  As at home on rock, surf board, and skis, or telling stories with his cameras, Corey Rich, a California-based outdoor adventure photographer, travels the globe on assignment. Corey consistently works for the top clients in the outdoor industry, pursuing rock climbing in Mexico, surfing in Panama, freight train hopping in the American West, ultra-marathon racing in the Sahara Desert of Morocco, and snowboarding in Papua New Guinea. From its conception, Corey has been a driving force in Aurora's Outdoor Collection. He continues to produce fresh work for both commercial and magazine clients.
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Introducing PatitucciPhoto  PatitucciPhoto is the unique combination of the husband and wife team of Dan and Janine Patitucci. Together, they have become one the top producers of outdoor and adventure stock. Based in both California and Switzerland, they have the opportunity to photograph many different environments. The images they produce are a result of their energetic and creative passion for the sports and experiences they pursue. From the beginning the Patituccis has been very active in Aurora's Outdoor Collection.
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The Photography of Pierre Boulat  Born in 1924 in France, photojournalist Pierre Boulat worked extensively for LIFE Magazine. While few know about him in the United States, he captured the most intimate moments of famous personalities such as Dali, Fernand Léger, Karen Blixen, Juliette Gréco, Gérard Depardieu and Henri Langlois. His interest in fashion lead him to meet Yves Saint Laurent who allowed him to document the dress designers world. Pierre Boulat died in January 1998, but his great work remains togehter with some commentary on each situation.
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Discover the Unexpected  Discover the unexpected at Aurora. It's about the image, the content and the context.
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Christmas Around the World  Join Aurora on a visual journey, Christmas Around the World. May your holiday season be a peaceful.
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Sichuan China  Bilderberg photographer Siegfried Martin traveled to the most remote areas of southwest China's, Sichuan (Four Rivers) Province, one of the largest and most inaccessible provinces in the nation. He returns with a textured and detailed impression of its people. To view all the images search 86179*
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Holland, Michigan 49422  Two and a half million people visit Holland each year - not the country across the ocean where the people wear wooden shoes, but the town (pop. 35,048) in Michigan that is home to six million tulips and an annual festival that celebrates the town's most beloved perennial.
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Introducing Bill Bachmann  Bill Bachmann has traveled the world bringing back classic images that depict the beauty and character of people and places that he photographs. Recognized as one of the top five stock photographers in the world, Bill has traveled to over 150 countries making remarkable images that are model and property released for commercial use. Aurora is pleased to offer a selection of some of Bill Bachmann's greatest images.
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Food in China  Few cultures are as food oriented as the Chinese. Variety is a cornerstone for many reasons, from China's size to famine. Having suffered from many poor harvests people would explore everything eatable to stay alive. Ingredients such as wood ears and lily buds were discovered this way. Scarcity also taught people how to avoid waste. Various fruit and vegetable peels and even shark fins turned out to be delicacies in Chinese food.
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Hurricane Katrina  The effects of Hurricane Katrina will be felt for a long time to come. Here's a sample of what Aurora affiliated photographers saw.
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Hurricane Katrina Aftermath  When hurricane Katrina slammed ashore August 29th with 150-mph (240-kph) winds no one imaged the aftermath it would bring in its wake. From a rescue workers perspective here are images that show its devestation and rescue efforts.
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Extreme Weather  Award-winning photographer Jim Reed has premium-quality, extraordinary weather images. He captures everything from cumulonimbus clouds and hoar frost to hurricanes and tornadoes. Aurora is proud to have such one of a kind work on our web site.
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New Yorkers  Aurora photographer Ashley Gilbertson looks at New Yorkers, a peculiar lot, who arguably, as a collective are more ambitious and driven than any community on earth. People flock to the city from all over the globe: to escape persecution, play tourist, seek opportunity or simply test their mettle. New York City has and does welcome everyone from misfits to masters. Hosting every culture imaginable, the city is the ultimate melting pot where life's ordinary events become extraordinary.
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Amphicars on Parade  "Amphipoda", "The Wave", and "The Splash King" are not superheroes, but they are capable of freely operating on land and in water. Their amphibious abilities aren't due to special powers, but to their Amphicars, which function as both cars and motorboats. And these fittingly nick-named men were just three of 200 Amphicar owners and enthusiasts who convened this past weekend for the 12th Annual International Amphicar Owner's Convention and Swim-In in Celina, Ohio, where the vehicles have delighted the local residents for the past seven years. Aurora has text that can be licensed along with the photographs for this story.
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Roller Girrrrls  The Skate Key Roller Rink in the South Bronx, NY. The match, a qualifying bout for the Gotham Girls Roller Derby League's semi-finals. Roller Derby originated during the depression, and had its heyday in the 1940’s and 1950’s. After fading into oblivion, the sport has made a comeback, updated with a more punk rock, hardcore feel in both the roller girls' sexy outfits and the ferocity and bruising nature of the sport. During a bout, five roller girls in each team face off in the rink, scoring points when a jammer passes the opposing team, which that team's blockers will try to prevent. Falls, entanglements and pile-ups result, much to the delight of the fans.
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On Borrowed Time  For the first time in the history of the AIDS, HIV-positive children are growing up to become teenagers. But a cure for the disease has yet to be found, and infected children have to cope with toxic, often experimental medical regimens and a budding consciousness of sexuality and the conflicts with the knowledge of their affliction.
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Didier Ruef's Africa  Didier Ruef of the Swiss photo agency Pixsil, has documented many African countries and its people. The images here are a sample of what he has seen, a world of traditional, social and international juxapositions.
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Western Wildfires  The West braces itself for another wildfire season. From the staff at the East Valley Tribune, these photographs tell the story of a recent Arizona blaze.
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Carbon Cycle Disturbed  The natural carbon cycle works when plants take in carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and replace oxygen. Since the burning of fossil fuels, humans have been adding excess carbon into the atmosphere which was locked up in coal and oil deposits. This excess is causing the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to rise and warm the earth like a greenhouse.
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A Wildlife Album  Photographer James Balog always goes beyond the visuals of a subject. This photographic album of endangered wildlife is no exception.
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Playing on Rocks  Looking for the real-deal when it comes to climbing photography? Look no further. The OC represents the top rock climbing shooters and photos of the creme of the crop climbers who scale the most challenging rock walls around the globe. A mix of rock, ice and big mountain climbing photography can be easily searched and found in quantity in the OC. These shooters and climbers takes huge risks and push well beyond self doubt and fear to bring the OC a one of a kind gallery of images from high above.
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Introducing Joe McBride  Aurora is thrilled to have Joe McBride contributing commercial driven photography to the Outdoor Collection. Based out of Los Angeles, Joe has been creating dynamic action sports photography and emotional charged lifestyle portraits for the last 14 years. Working closely with an art director at Aurora, Joe has been creating fresh imagery following current trends and the needs of today's art buyer. His easy going personality and top-notch professionalism clearly shows through the images Joe creates.
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A Way of Life  The Outdoor Collection bring outdoor adventure lifestyle to a level that is like no other. Our photographers bring the outdoor lifestyle genere to a unqiue space where creativity, unqiueness and visual impact are all part of the final product. While encompassing a creative style appropriate for a commercial audience, the pictures also retain a feeling of real people in real situations. This refined selection was hand picked by our editors to show a sampling of what the OC has to offer.
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Essential Successful Teamwork  The concept of teamwork can successfully be illustrated by using imagery of adventure sports. Activities such as sailing, climbing, sculling and adventure racing show people working together to accomplish goals. The OC provides many options for art-buyers looking for imagery of teamwork, cooperation and partnership.
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Introducing Michael Scott Slosar  Michael Scott Slosar brings a unique look to his imagery of the human spirit. Deeply personal with a strong sense of mood and atmosphere, these images evoke the inner spirit. Michael's ability to make pictures that tell a story is keen, focused and full of emotion. Slosar with this first set of photos now represented for stock by Aurora.
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The Maine Lobster  Lobster is woven into the fabric of Maine’s culture as long as anyone can remember. The cold, clean waters of Maine’s rocky coast provide an ideal habitat for lobster. Maine's lobstermen are guardedly optimistic about the 2005 season and have been surprised to see signs of an earlier start. Pat White of the Maine Lobstermen's Association says no one knows why signs point toward an earlier start this year. Sometimes, it doesn't pay to try to figure out the habits of Maine's most valuable sea creature. "We can't figure out how to outsmart an animal with no brain," said White, a lobsterman based in York Harbor.
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A Classic Yacht Admired  Michael Eudenbach's ability to capture the true essence of sailing comes from years of voyaging open waters around the world. His unique experience of traveling, working and shooting aboard Endeavour provided amazing opportunities to capture fresh, powerful and conceptual photography . Michael captured this classic yacht on film in all it's glory from amazing perspectives that only a true yachtsman, who happens to be an outstanding photographer, is able to capture.
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A Unique Look at Guantanamo  Last month, Amnesty International called Guantanamo "the gulag of our time," sparking a storm of protests from administration supporters. Currently a Time Magazine report fuels Guantanamo criticism. Aurora photographer Robb Kendrick toured the military base in Cuba where “unlawful combatants” have been kept since the Afghan war and emerged with a unique set of images that help frame current events on the base.
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Faces of the Outdoors  Jeff Singer's portraits carry the raw, yet soft feel of air and sea. Reflected in the eyes are the emotions of each subjects. Jeff creates a look that is strikingly beautiful with a perspective that jumps over standard outdoor portrait.
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The Battle for Fallujah  Photojournalist Ashley Gilbertson of the Aurora photography agency, has won the Robert Capa Gold Medal in the Overseas Press Club (OPC) awards for best photographic reporting from abroad requiring exceptional courage and enterprise for his work, “The Battle for Fallujah.” An honor that places him among a long list of revered conflict photographers.
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The Transvestites of Pakistan  On the bottom rungs of Pakistan's social ladder, the eunuch-transvestites or "Hijras" scrape out a hard existence. Cultural descendants of the court eunuchs of the Mughal Empire (1526-1858), the Hijras now earn their living as beggars, dancers and prostitutes.
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The Eagle Lady  Every winter for 25 years, “The Eagle Lady”, 81 year old Jean Keene, has fed a gathering of bald eagles in Homer, Alaska. What began as a pair of birds became more than 200! Her daily congregation of eagles is hard to believe, but well documented. In the biographical, pictorial book, "The Eagle Lady," Aurora’s contributing photographer, Cary Anderson, illustrates Keene's fascinating life among the eagles and recounts her earlier, little-known days as a rodeo daredevil. Generous text excerpts from the book are available from Aurora as part of this feature.
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Congress Passes ANWR  March 17, 2005 - The Senate voted yesterday 51-49 in favor of oil drilling in Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Hurdles still remain, yet drilling advocates said they were close to achieving their long fight to tap billions of barrels of oil beneath the 1.5 million-acre tundra. Search ANWR for more images of the Refuge on www.auroraphotos.com
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The Kingdom of Mustang  Geographically and culturally more a part of Tibet than Nepal, Mustang contains a wild landscape of eroded cliffs and hidden caves. Little changed by twentieth century influences, the culture of the hardy Lobas people remains full of myth and legend. Mustang was founded in the 15th century by a Tibetan monarch who consolidated various small local chiefdoms into the Kingdom of Lo. Eventually Mustang was incorporated into Nepal but it has remained isolated, and rarely visited.
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Color and Light  Abstract patterns of colorful light.
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Global Warming  Global warming has been called the most important issue in science today. The data shows that humans are causing the planet to warm by burning fossil fuels. If the warming continues and the computer models are accurate, millions of people and whole ecosystems could be adversly affected. Peter Essick travelled to many remote locations around the world to document the changes scientists are beginning to observe. Aurora has a complete collection of all the major components of this important issue.
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The Shapes of Leaves  Walter Schiesswohl of Hamburg, Germany presents a selection of leaf images in all their many forms and shapes, designs of nature.
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The Land: Patagonia Part I  “Torres del Paine National Park, which is a World Heritage Site, has an almost unreal landscape, with vibrant green vegetation, turquoise blue water, and amazing light at sunrise.” This is just one of the impressions Aurora photographer Peter Essick had after spending several months in Patagonia. There Peter photographed the land and the people.
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The People: Patagonia Part II  Aurora photographer Peter Essick spent several months in Patagonia. There he photographed the land and the people. Peter tells us of one individual, "Joaquin Nonso in the northern Patagonian town of Gaima. He's about 82 years old and runs an outdoor gallery in his backyard that he calls El Desafío (The Challenge). He takes discards such as old plastic bottles, tins, and soda cans, and makes artwork out of them."
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Introducing Marc Steinmetz  Hamburg-based photographer, Marc Steinmetz leads his field in science and technology photography. He is a story teller, as well as a fantastic illustrator of concepts and ideas. However, he lives in constant fear. As he puts it, "The nagging fear of not being good enough constantly drives me to improve on my work. ”
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Introducing Christian Heeb  With more than 90 published travel books on subjects ranging from Southern Africa and Morocco to France and most parts of North America and the Caribbean, Aurora proudly introduces Christian Heeb's photography.
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Tunisia for Tourists  Tunisia's beautiful beaches and historical treasures attract nearly 5 million each year. They come for the history, architecture and the 810 mile coastline. They sunbath, dive, and sail along the vast stretches of white sand beaches along the Mediterranean. The visit the Punic and Roman archaeological sites in Carthage and 2nd Century Roman temple in Dougga, the Phoenician port of Utica, and El Jem's Coliseum, which is second only to Rome. The Bardo Museum, near Tunis, boasts the largest collection of Roman mosaics in the world. Masterpieces of Arab-Islamic architecture attract other visitors.
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Remember: Martin Luther King  "Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that." -- Martin Luther King - 1929-1968
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Tsunami Devastation  The New York Times wrote: Of the countries affected by the tsunami, none has suffered proportionately more devastation than Sri Lanka, with 30,000 people reported killed out of a population of just 19.5 million. (Indonesia has three times as many dead, but it has more than seven times the population.) In Indonesia, India and Thailand, the damage was largely confined to one geographical area, while 70 percent of Sri Lanka's 830-mile coastline was swept by the roiling waters. 1/5/05
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The Banana Business  There is much to learn about the banana and plantain business in Central and South America. Join Peter as he documents the cultural, environmental and social impact of this industry.
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Olympics 2004  Summer Olympic Games in Athens, Greece
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Introducing Paul Souders  Do a search for "Souders" on Aurora's site and these are some of the images that appear. Range, versatility, quality and more comes from Paul Souders' photography. Enjoy looking and searching through his expanded collection.
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Azerbaijan Oil  Currently Turkmenistan and Azerbijan are discussing ownership of some very productive oil fields that lie in the middle of Caspian. Both sides have repeatedly expressed desire to to settle the Caspian question of boundaries. Azerbijan is developing some of these fields unilaterally but the exploitation would continue to lack a legal backing until the sides can agree on the dividing line. Turkmenistan and Azerbijan agreed in February 1998 that the dividing line between their zones should be drawn along the median line but it would be necessary to ascertain the exact location of the median line before any division can take place.
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Abkhazia  After the fall of the Soviet Union, Abkhazia declared independence, Georgia invaded and the country was ravaged. The Georgians withdrew in 1993, but since Abkhazia has endured an ironclad embargo from both Russia and Georgia. Although the Georgian troops are gone, Abkhazia is not recognized as a state by the international community, instead it is trapped in a brutal limbo- a country forgotten by the world.
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Black and White Dreams  Objects and places form the stuff of dreams when seen through home-made lenses by photographer Todd Korol.
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Falluja Offensive  November 2004 - In Falluja US marines control most of this Iraqi city, with rebels hemmed into a narrow strip. US officials say insurgents are now in "small pockets", while fighting continues for control of the centre. These are some of the photographs shot by Aurora photographer Ashley Gilberston, who has been covering Iraq since before the war began.
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Presidential Debates 2004  Aurora brings you a selection of interesting images from the US Presidential debates on October 14, 2004. The complete set of images may be seen by searching for "80847*".
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Kerry-Bush Campaign 2004  German-born photographer Katja Heinemann brings a fresh look to the US Presidential election.
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Winter in Yellowstone and the Tetons  Few, if any places can provide the spectacular scenery and abundant wildlife one can see in Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks in winter. Mystical, lovely, even surreal, the landscape takes forms that inspire and cause us to pause.
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A Small Place in the Desert - Oualata  Listed on the World Human Heritage site, Oualata has resisted a hostile climate, the advance of the desert, absence of drinking water and remoteness. Yet, it is the most beautiful city of Mauritania, well known for the intricate, architectural ornamentation. The beautiful designs on walls and doors are mainly made from local gypsum and clay. In addition the traveler will find a world-famous Koranic school that positions the city as one of the most renowned centers of Islamic scholarship in the Sahara region. In contrast, with no surface roads and one airstrip,.Oualata is used for the internal exile of Mauritanian political prisoners.
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Hammam  When the conquering empire receded south, the architectual remains of the Greek and Roman baths and the balnea gave way to the bath houses, or hammams of Islam. However, not until Muhammed praised the use of sweat baths in the 5th Century did the Islamic hammam proliferate.
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Remembering D-Day - The Place Today  Almost sixty years after the invasion of Nazi-occupied France by Allied US, British, and Canadian forces, the memory endures. This, one of the most dangerous and deadly military engagemnts of the last century is examined visually by three photographers. Please, view the work of Pierre Boulat, Helene Bamberger, and Eduardo Nave on the beaches where hundreds of thousands lost their lives.
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A Slow Boat to Somewhere  The cargo ship "Kura Ora" ("Good Morning") is the lifeline of the Tuamotu Islands, French Polynesia's 3000 mile long archipelago. The rusty, 163-foot vessel travels to 21 of the 78 Tuamotu Islands, covering a distance of over 900 miles on its monthly run. The ship brings vital supplies to the islands, transporting everything from food, fuel, and lumber to beer, bikes and tractors--over 600 tons of supplies. Truly making it the lifeline of the islanders and one of the world's most unique cargo ships.
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Fat Camp  The latest statistics show that as many as 30 percent of children aged 6-19 in the U.S. are overweight. Obesity puts them at increased risk for chronic diseases such as heart disease, high blood pressure, and diabetes and emotional problems in adolescence and adulthood. Some parents are trying to find a solution by sending their children to "Fat Camp" for the summer. Weight loss camps are usually advertised as a "fitness camps", but many campers call it "fat camp". A main goal of these camos is to raise the child's self-esteem through social interactions with others who share many of the same characteristics
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Wildlife Relocation  The relocation of wildlife has replaced natural migration as human development has closed the ancient paths African animals used to follow. A seasonal operation that takes place when animals are under least stress, predators, antelope, giraffe and even elephant are captured and moved for commercial or scientific reasons. It is even possible for tourists to join in certain relocations.
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Lighthouses  The earliest lighthouses were simply bonfires built on hillsides to guide ships. The first light served the old world city of Alexandria in 285 B.C. The first American light came to life in 1716 at Boston Harbor. Aurora brings you a selection by several photographers.
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Images of Argentina  Patagonia, the tango and gauchos, what can be more Argentine? Read onÉ..
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South American Sandboarding  Fans of American snowboarding magazines find their out excitement in southern Peru. They have discovered a boarder's paradise, the Ica Desert, which boast some of the longest slopes in the world. "Tell the snowboarders to come here. There aren't any avalanches, the weather is always good and sand doesn't melt!"
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Women's Labor in Asia  In the global economy new centers of garment production have appeared in Asian countries like China, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka. Fernando Moleres documents these new centers, showing the working conditions and way of life of workers there.
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Haiti  Looting over the weekend overwhelmed Port Au Prince and Jean-Bertrand Aristide departs for Africa. Armed rebel leaders swept into this capital and occupied the national police headquarters.
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Chacma Baboons  Aurora photographer Adrian Bailey has spent four months with one troop in northern Botswana’s Selinda Reserve, first habituating the troop to his presence on foot, and then photographing their fascinating natural history. As the accompanying photographs illustrate, chacma baboons spend their entire waking moments interacting with other troop members: grooming, playing or fighting and constantly establishing and finetuning an intricate network of allies that are the core of the troops’ existence
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Impressions of Chicago  Al Capone, the Pullman Era, the Stockyards and the Black Sox, Chicago endures. Today, the sights and colors of the Windy City form a world well captured by the eye of Jon Lowenstein in his impressions of Chicago.
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Water Issues  Already overburdened, the Earth's six billion people can't get enough of fresh water. With populations continuing to climb, what happens next? Read on...
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ANWR Alaska  At about 19 million acres, the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) is the largest refuge in the National Wildlife Refuge System. On Alaska's North Slope, it is about the size of the state of North Carolina. The refuge's 1002 Area, about the size of the state of Delaware, is the center of statewide and national debate over oil exploration in the refuge. Read moreÉ.
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Hawaii's Big Island  The spirit and energy of creation surrounds you on Hawaii's Big Island. Polynesians claims the goddess Pele gave volcanic birth to the Islands of Aloha. Hawaii's Big Island is her latest and greatest creation. Still warm from its fiery birth and growing every day as its active volcano, Kilauea, sends new land to a steamy meeting with the ocean 4,000 feet below. Countless waterfalls feeding rain forests of botanical wonder add a fantasy flavor to the landscape. Massive black lava fields hint at the island's relative youth.
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Introducing Russell Gordon  Over the past 10 years, Russell Gordon has covered people, news and events in more than 30 countries in Asia, Europe, Africa and the Americas. In Afghanistan, Cambodia, Yugoslavia and the Bosnian Serb Republic, he has reported on civil war and ethnic. He has been published in many international publications such as Newsweek/Japan, Newsweek en Espanol, TIME Magazine, Business Week/Latin America, GEO Germany, Neue Revue, Lufthansa Magazine and more. Currently he is based and home in Mexico City.
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Eating in America  America loves to eat. Whether its carefully aged Prosciutto, Genera Tao's chicken, or a french fry sandwich, no fear exists. Take a quirky look at middle America's love affair with food through Pittsburgh Pennsylvania's Strip District, a place where people from diverse ethnic backgrounds come together to celebrate food and the art of eating.
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Campaigning Comes to Iowa   Iowa in winter can be a lonely landscape--stark, frozen, and seemingly uninhabited. Yet in the months preceding the Iowa caucuses, inside countless diners and VFW halls, a second landscape emerges, one where the state's provincial populace hobnobs with presidential contenders. There is a saying that nobody in Iowa decides whom they will vote for until they have had breakfast with him twice. Indeed, the caucuses create an unlikely privilege: the chance for a reserved, rural state to determine a presidential frontrunner.
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Methamphetamine: The Number One Drug Problem in America  The head of the Drug Enforcement Administration has called methamphetamine the "number one drug problem in America." Snohomish County Washington, north of Seattle, is representative of the trend in rural and suburban ar
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The Big Dig  The Central Artery/Tunnel Project in Boston, MA is the largest highway project in American history.
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Introducing Adrian Mueller  Adrian Mueller, member of Swiss group fabrik studios and recipient of the 'Max Husmann Grant for excellence in social photography,' has worked on several documentary projects including 'Station of Hope - Child labor in Bangladesh' and 'Guinea pig - Humans as test subjects for NASA'. His work has been published in National Geographic Japan, Shape Magazine, Stern & Business Week. He has shot commercial assignments for clients such as Timberland, New Balance and Cannondale. More...
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Picasso Museum  Last year the Buenavista Palace was restored and opened for the long anticipated Picasso Museum, in Picasso's home town of Malaga, Spain.
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Home Schooling USA  Homeschool USA Chronicling a family’s first-year journey into the homeschooling phenomenon sweeping America It’s a day like any other as 8am approaches at...read on...
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White Side of the Moon  
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Elephant Polo  Elephant polo was first played in India around the turn of the 20th century by members of the British aristocracy. The first games were played with a soccer ball, but after finding that the elephants like to smash the balls, the soccer ball was replaced with a standard polo ball. Strange? There's more....
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Sudan's Refugees  A recent peace accord brings hope and not a little cynicism for the refugees of Sudan’s long standing civil war. Read On.
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Poker Fever  Red Hot Poker...The nation is being swept up in Poker fever as evident in the latest "reality tv" program drawing 5 million viewers each week to the Travel Channel's World Poker Tour program. So what's next?
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The Nuba  In the Nuba Mountains of Sudan the traditional way of life of it’s people a hard battle is being fought. Hunger and sickness have affected the physiques of the Nuba, yet they persever. Even though tens of thousands died and hundreds of thousands have been forced into government camps, more than a million survive. Meredith Davenport takes us into their world. More….
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The Portraiture of Serge Cohen  On being a photographer he says, "It's something you are born with. You choose photography as a profession because you want to learn, because you want everyday to be filled with a journey, a human, an idea, something that all the others don't see."
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Logistics Iraq  American forces in Iraq consumed more than 200,000 gallons of water and roughly a million gallons of fuel every day—all of which had to be trucked hundreds of miles into Iraq from Camp Arifjan in Kuwait.
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Cowgirl Queens  Want to represent the sport of rodeo, take home a new Western Wear wardrobe and win $10,000 in college scholarship money? Here’s how.
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Crazy Bikes  On June 26, 1819 W. K. Clarkson, Jr. was granted a U.S. patent for a "velocipede", a bicycle where the pedals are attached to the front wheel, but a fire destroyed the records. The actual design isn't known and early American interest in his invention was, to say the least, underwhelming. However, it seems things have changed, read on..
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Central Park Turns 150  In 1853 the middle of Manhattan became a great public park. This year Central Park turns 150 years old. But there's more...
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Silent Company  
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Palmyra Atoll  The largest purchase to date for the Nature Conservancy is the Palmyra atoll situated about 300 miles north of the equator.
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Madagascar Unseen  The Malagasy proverb claims: "They who drink the water from the Manangareza river always come back to Madagascar". Read on…
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Mass Graves in Iraq  Moussayib, Iraq, May 24, 2003 More than 400 bodies from people missing since their arrest by Hussein Kamal, Saddam's son-in-law and his men, in March 1991 were found in mass-graves in Djur Al Saher.
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Garden's Bounty  Italian chef Benedetta Vitali of the award winning restaurant, Zibibbo, asked the creative, husband & wife team of Barbara and Cary Wolinsky to visually explore Italian cooking for her latest cook book. Check it out.
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Day Labor Golf Caddies  Meet the PGA version of day labor; Caddies without Bags. Each week dozens, more if you count the amateurs, of professional caddies with decades caddying on the PGA Tour gather on a Monday in the parking lot where tour caddies enter with hopes of getting
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The Wild Dogs of Selinda  Each year around June, the African Wild Dog, one of Africa's most endangered carnivores, begins the process of raising a litter. The hope of the species falls on the pups, staving off extinction for a few more years. Come and follow...
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Women Senators  Changing the Face of Power - Women are transforming this country's most prestigious governing body. Their bi-partisan teamwork, compassion for social issues, and coalition building, are laying a foundation for a new type of politician.
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Migrant´s Journey  Migrant workers routinely embark on dangerous border crossings seeking jobs in the US. A crackdown by the border patrol has changed the conditions of routes and methods of obtaining entry.
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The Portraiture of Carolyn Djanogly  From her home-base of London, Carolyn Djanogly has been specializing in portraiture for magazines and newspapers worldwide. We invite you to take a look at her work.
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Iraq After the War  The young Polish photographer Lukasz Trzcinski presents a small look (in 12 b&w photos) inside the post-war Iraq and the Iraqi society after the regime collapsed.
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The Longest Day  This is a look at the first 24 hours of Angel Coronado's release from a Texas prison, from 10:00am on a Friday until 10:00am the following morning.
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Sand Cities  Deep in the Mauritanian Desert the sand cities of Ouadane, Witness daily life in Ouadane, Chinguetti, Tichit, and Oualata, all cities that date from the 10th Century and all named World Human Heritage sites by Unesco.
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Vipassana - Reform from Within  Vipassana, an ancient Buddhist meditation technique has been introduced to the Tihar Jail, the largest prison complex in India.
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KirKuk Arab and Kurd Tension  
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WW II Again  World War II takes place each year in Reading, Pennsylvania. There are bombed-out French villages constructed of plywood, vintage trucks, machine guns and jeeps, and lot's of GIs and German soldiers participating mock battles.
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Abu Ghraib - Shiites mourn April 25, 03  
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Shia Karbala Pilgrimage April 23, 2003  Kabala, Southern Iraq Shia muslims in a procession outside the Imam Hussein mosque. Imam Hussein, the son of the prophet Mohammad, was beheaded on this day over a thousand years ago by Arabs, and Shia's regards this site as their third holiest on earth.
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Kirkuk and Baghdad April 13  
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Tikrit Iraq - April 14  
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Mosul Iraq - Jubilant Kurds and Arabs celebrate April 11  
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Baghdad - looting aftermath April 13  
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Northern Iraq  Coverage from several northern cities and the Kurds involvement in the war to liberate Iraq.
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Fall of Baghdad - April 9, 03  
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Khalak frontline, Northern Iraq - April 8  Fighting here has been very intense and the Kurds are fighting under command of US special forces soldiers on a daily basis. This frontline has been held up for five days now in it's advance to Mosul, the oil rich city controlled by Saddam.
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Baghdad - Siege and destruction April 7  
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Baghdad - Citizens panic in the streets  
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Baghdad - Casualties at Al Kindi hospital April 5  
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Iraq April 4, 2003 by Ashley Gilbertson  
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Bruno Stevens- Civilian Casualties April 1-2, 2003  April 1-2, 2003: Hilla Hospital in Iraq. Civilian casualties resulting from US cluster bombs during Operation Iraqi Freedom.
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Ashley Gilbertson- Iraq April 1, 2003  Kurdish Forces and the Allies in Northern Iraq
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TV wars - perspective from Jerusalem - March  Nowhere is the explosion of the information age more dramaticthan in Jerusalem. Next door neighbors are watching two completelydifferent versions of the war.
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US Media saturation - New York City - March 19-28  Images around New York City of public saturation of the media coverage. Many protesters are specifically targeting the networks with their messages.
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Khalak Northern Iraq - Missle attacks March 28  
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The Military Enters American Public Schools  In Oakland California, on a decommissioned naval base, 200 7th and 8thgrade children in military uniforms line up in platoon formation...
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Baghdad March 29, Funerals and sorrow  Funerals are held for civilians reportedly injured in Coalition bombings.
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Iraq March 28, Big bombs drop  
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1000 US Paratroopers seize airfield in Northern Iraq March 27  2003.03.27 Hareer Air strip, Northern Iraq US special forces patrol the air strip, about two hours north of Erbil, after reports claim that 1000 troops landed here last night.
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Handicapped Skiing  MHS is a non-profit organization that has been in operation for 21 years. Each season the organization outfits, teaches and provides a comfortable environment for more than 200 outdoor enthusiasts with a broad spectrum of disabilities, free of charge.
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Northern Iraq - Defectors from Iraqi regular army  
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Baghdad Casualties - 3/25,26/03  Casualties in the hospital and operating room.
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Home Schooling  It's a day like any other as 8am approaches at Mission Preparatory School in a middle-class suburb of Los Angeles. Still sleepy eyes focus on the flag, hands are placed over the heart and a chorus of young voices repeat the Pledge of Allegiance in mumbled unison, filling the room with the distinct sounds of a new school day. Like millions of other school kids across America students at Mission Prep will tackle reading, writing and arithmetic this day, not to mention art, history, science and physical education. There will be shouts of joy when it's time for recess and distinct moans when it's time to return to class.

Mission Prep, however, is not part of the behemoth Los Angeles Unified School District, the nation's second largest school district known for severely overcrowded schools. In fact, Mission Prep claims an enrollment of just three students, all brothers, and one volunteer teacher who goes by the name “mommy.” Sidewalk chalk and a blacktop driveway are sometimes used as a chalkboard, a science exercise means a trip down the weed-strewn alley, and PE is often a competitive game of handball against the family's garage.

Mission Prep, a homeschool in its' inaugural year, is clearly not your normal academic institution.

Or is it?

A closer look reveals that homeschools, once discounted as a counterculture idea appealing to extreme liberals and the Christian conservative, are growing at an astounding rate nationwide. Consider that homeschooling nearly tripled in the 1990's, and continues with a growth rate of 20-25%, and it's abundantly clear that America has radically changed its' perspective on homeschooling.

Few will argue that a child's education is the single most important responsibility facing parents. Similarly, few will argue that educating our children is the single most important responsibility we face as a nation.

Research clearly shows America in the midst of a significant transformation regarding the way we educate our children. “Home schooling is one of the fastest growing movements in the country,” writes Lance Izumi, a Senior Fellow in California Studies at the Pacific Research Institute for Public Policy.

“In light of the educational quagmire the United States finds itself in......many parents, impatient for reform, are taking matters into their own hands,” writes Isabel Lyman in a CATO Institute policy analysis.

An increasing number of parents “simply seek the highest quality education for their child, which they believe public and even private schools can no longer provide,” Patricia Lines, a former Senior Research Analyst for the U.S. Department of Education recently told Brown University Alumni magazine.

Mainstream Americans are embracing homeschooling like never before. Parents weary of overcrowded schools, poor standards, school violence and teacher shortages, or just desiring a better education, are pulling their kids from traditional schools and switching to homeschooling, thus ballooning the ranks nationwide to over one million children. A shift by society on such a substantive issue as education deserves to be documented.

Families, experts and research indicate that all homeschools are non-profit by nature, if not by official status (ie: 501c3). The notion of earning a profit from their homeschool is deplorable, say homeschoolers, yet the majority of homeschools choose to avoid filing their 501c3 papers, thus creating a very large, "underground" national community of non-profit schools. The decision to not file for official non-profit status stems from a fear of inviting scrutiny from governing boards such as California's State Board of Education.

So here is a look at the Smith's non-profit Mission Prep school during it's inaugural year
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New York City Pro-War Rally  Photographs by Nina Berman
On March 23, 2003 Supporters of the Iraq war, turn out for a support President Bush and the troops demonstration in Times Square sponsored by the Christian Coalition, pro-Israeli groups, and conservative organizations.
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Habitat for Humanity  Across the United States, a Habitat for Humanity build brings many different people together to help give others a roof over their heads and a place to call home.
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Baghdad March 24  The city copes with destruction from US Bombs and oil fires.
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Guyana  Multi-nationals raping a once pristine jungle are now in conflict with the traditional way of life of the Guyana Amerindian population.
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Isreal waits and sees  On the opening day of war in Iraq, in Israel all remains peaceful and life goes on.
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CNN gets expelled from Iraq  Baghdad, Iraq, March 22, 2003 Nick Robertson, center, light blue shirt, and the CNN crew preparing to leave Baghdad Saturday at dawn after being expelled by the Iraqi Minister of Information.
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Journalist Paul Moran murdered in car bombing.March 24  Paul Moran, a freelance cameraman working for ABC Australia, died in an attack which authorities here have attributed to Ansar al-Islam, a fundamentalist Islamic group in the region
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Baghdad - Collateral Damage 3/22/03  Casualties of war in Baghdad.
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Bush announces War  After giving Iraq 48 hours, Bush announces War on National Television
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Baghdad Bombing - 3/21/03  Night time bombing in Baghdad by US Forces.
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Baghdad March 21, 2003  Life goes on in Baghdad, Soccer matches are played and attended, some civilian casualties and guards on the street.
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Soldiers Departing  Troop Preparation before departure to the Gulf Region at Fort Stewart, Georgia.
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New York City Security  New York City is under intensified security conditions both visible and invisible.
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Kurds with gas masks - March 08,2003  2003.03.08, Erbil, Northern Iraq A Kurdish civilian tries on a home made gas mask.
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Baghdad First day of war  ghdad, Iraq, March 20, 2003 A US bomb or missile lands on the Eastern outskirts of Baghdad at dawn, about an hour after the first explosions and anti-aircraft activities were heard in the Iraqi capital. Iraqis show defiance in the streets of B
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Kurdish Rebel Leaders  Kurdish Rebel Leaders: Massoud Barzani, Jalal Talabani, Abdullah Ocalan
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Pesh Merga and the PKK  Pesh merga, the storied Kurdish militia
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Mogadishu, Somalia  The Somali peace talks currently underway in Kenya (March 2003) are in danger of collapsing. What is it like in Mogadishu today?
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Sonoran Desert  Tour the great expanse of the Sonoran desert-- blanketing the earth from Southern Arizona to California, and deep into the Mexican states of Sonora and the peninula of Baja California. A dessicated land of muted
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Turkey - Ashley Gilbertson 2002  
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Kurdistan - Chemical attack aftermath 2002  
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US Weaponry  The arsenol of the United State military.
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The Pride of Selinda  The lion pride is widely held to be a stereotypical grouping of females and their cubs lorded over by a set of dominant males who, in return for protecting the territory, greedily appropriate most of the females hard
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Delray Beach Homefront Patrol  Beware the terrorist who crosses paths with the Delray beach Homefront Patrol.
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Chobe National Park  Botswana's Chobe National Park was proclaimed in 1961. Bounded in the north by the Chobe river and extending southwards to the Mababe depression, this 11 000 square kilometer park is the third largest in the countr
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Homeland Security  Various scenes from around the country showing how 9/11 has affected our lives.
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Lynching trial in Jasper Texas  A black man James Byrd, Jr. was chained to the back of a pick-up truck and dragged to his death by three white supremacists. Jasper Texas has been brought into the spotlight by a PBS documentary.
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The Rolling Stones  The Rolling Stones in concert.
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Best Friends Animal Sanctuary  Photographs by Bridget Besaw Gorman
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Everest: 50th Anniversary  
View this collection of images from Aurora on Everest, Sherpa's an
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Fulton Fish Market  A New York City establishment for 160 years soon to disappear - but for now still hustling and bustling with activity and tradition.
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Exonerated  Portraits of death row prisoners subsequently found innocent and released. Read their stories.
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New Zealand  Birth place of the Bungee jump, land of mist and ice, from vineyards to caves and glaciers an adventurer's paradise.
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Fresh Water  Photographs by Peter Essick
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American '50's - Sentimental Journey  Certain memories unite us-memories of a place, a time, a shared experience.
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Twelve Exonerated  Despite international criticism, America is committed to executing criminals sentenced to death in its courts.
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The Morpho  
Several varieties of the Morpho Butterfly which ranges from southern Mexico to central Argentina. Considered by some to be the symbol of the Neo-Tropics it's beauty is elusive and hypnotic.
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Iceberg Alley  Iceberg Alley is the name given to the waters that run from Greenland to Newfoundland and Labrador.
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Civil War Re-enactment  Polariod impressions of an American tradition. For US News.
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Masters of the Hunt  Coyote hunting in California. Americans pursue the tradition and trappings of English fox hunting.
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Nuclear Waste  World Press Photo: 1st Prize Stories Science & Technology
A wide and in depth look at the legacy of the United State's Atomic and Nuclear programs - Clean up, Disposal and Storage. More situations availab
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Kurdistan  An up to date in depth view of life in Kurdistan. A nation that does not technically exist yet manages to survive caught between religion, politics and geography.
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Color Outdoor Stock  Scenics and adventure stock from various locations.
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Marine Recruitment  At Parris Island, S.C. Marine recruitment takes on an interesting twist.
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September 11th Anniversary  People in New York City on the one year anniversary of the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks.
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Endeavour  Follow the exciting and dangerous sport of America's Cup style racing aboard the Endeavour through the eyes of photographer/crew member Michael Eudenbach.
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Symbols of Freedom  For Americans and visitors from other countries, these monuments embody the principles of freedom our founding fathers dreamed of and a nation has fought for.
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Stories and Images from 9/11  In remembrance of last year's tragedy, Aurora would like to share with you Lynn Johnson's diary of her experience in her words and images.
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The Lewis and Clark Trail  Almost 200 years ago the land's of Native Americans, bison and wilderness began an epic of change.
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American Christmas  A drive across America reveals a Christmas landscape.
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Cyber Sex - Big Business Online  You can make money on the Internet. Sex.
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Drakensberg Mountain Range  Adrian Bailey and writer David Bristow attempt South Africa's largest range known as the Dragon's Mountain. Full Text Available For License.
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Martha Stewart  Martha Stewart on the set of her television show, Connecticut.
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Israeli Settlements  At the heart of the conflict between Israelis and Palestinians, these settlements stand at the edge between domestic calm and all out war.
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Becoming Their Mom  Retired gunsmith Ben Kilham lends a hand to mother nature by nurturing orphaned black bear cubs, preparing them for for the elements of life in the woods near Lyme, New Hampshire. From foraging for food to protecting
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Soccer Around the World  The passion for Soccer reaches even the most remote of places. Soccer fields dot the urban and rural landscape around the world much the way baseball fields do here in the USA.
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Rose Marasco  Common everyday occurrences described in color, light and shade.
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Dublin  Street life and culture at the turn of the new century in Dublin, Ireland.
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Aurora in Space  From JFK's historic pronouncement to the Space Shuttle and beyond.
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Now and Then  In the summer of 2001 laif photographer T. A. Hoffman finished work on his large format New York calendar and noticed a predominance of World Trade Towers in the images.
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Alzheimers  An intimate portrait of a devasting disease from the German Agency laif.

Photographer Peter Granser has won an award. View details
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Introducing Shoshannah White  New Illustrative work with a unique perspective. Traditional photography using multiple processes.
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Rhythm of the Tides  Explore the Grand Manan Island fisheries in New Brunswick, Canada.
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Sleep Deprivation  Many laboratories worldwide conduct sleep research and studies on sleep deprivation. The main purpose is to examine how the daily light-dark cycle in the environment affects the timing of hormone release, the daily cycle of body temperatures, the sleep-wake cycle, and the inner body functions, which ordinarily vary according to the time of day. These studies are conducted with paid volunteer test subjects and help to understand the basis of certain diseases as well as the effects on performance of sleep deprived individuals, such as airline pilots and NASA astronauts.
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Hugh Brantner  Still lives in and out of the studio and stock in various styles.
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Tatshenshini  Follow an expedition through the winding path of the Tatshenshini river in British Columbia. The river runs through cool green mountains and ice blue glaciers.
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Oskalooska  In the wake of September 11 lives a small town in America; a place where there's prayer in school, football heroes are created, corn fields grow and people lead simple yet satisfying lives.
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Women of Afghanistan  This is the story of Afghanistan as it was before the events of September 11th, at a time when the world's focus was not on this dry, Middle Eastern country and the Taliban reigned supreme.
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The Eyes Have It  Whether caught in fleeting glimpses or trapped in an unflinching stare, a certain power is revealed in the focus of a seeing eye. In this image collection the eyes have it; take a look and consider what it is to see or be seen.
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Red Red and More Red  
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Blazing  
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Seeing Double  
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Two Thirds of the Earth  
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New Wellness Stock Photos  A selection of wellness stock.
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Afghanistan, Stay or Go?  Chris Anderson visits a remote district in the Afghan mountains where the people are suffering from starvation, disease, extreme weather conditions, and the Taliban.
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Formula 1 Grand Prix  Formula One would not be as widely known today were if not for one man, race circuit owner Bernie Ecclestone, his mind races faster and sleeker than the cars themselves. Formula One auto racing thrills its fans from
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The Age of E-Mail  It's been 30 years since the first email made its way through a computer room in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Now, billions of emails crisscross cyberspace every day. There are email addicts, hackers, and kidnappers send
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Enron's Former Chief  Former Enron head Kenneth Lay joins a long list of Enron excutives who refuse to cooperate with the investigation of the energy giant's collapsed company.
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State of the Union Address  President Bush gives his State of the Union address to Congress on 1/29/02 .Vice President Dick Cheney and Speaker of the House, Dennis Hastert sit behind Bush.
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Olympic Gold  How Federal Taxpayers Paid for the Salt Lake City Games. As reported in the December 10th issue of Sports Illustrated
Photographed by Todd Bigelow/Aurora
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Evidence  New York City continues to recover from the devastating events of September 11th. The huge pile of rubble that resulted from the collapse of both World Trade Center buildings has mostly been cleared away from
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Cuban Cars  In Cuba politics and necessity have conspired to create a living snapshot of America's golden age of automobiles.
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West Bank by Nina Berman  
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Crossing the Sahara  The Sahara's Ténéré is a chunk of the planet gone dead, 154,000 square miles [398,860 square kilometers] of nothing-except for faith, war, salt, beer, speed … and an urgent sense of what it is to be alive.
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African Buffalo  Formidable adversary of lion, vengeful beast of hunting folklore and neighborhood thug in the rural village, the African buffalo is one of the most feared animals on the continent.
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The Children of Chernobyl  Fifteen years since the disaster at Chernobyl, Cuba is still receiving and treating the radiation fallout victims. Over 19,000 children have been treated since the program started.
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The Khanty of Siberia  The Khanty people of northwestern Siberia have lived there for thousands of years as fishermen, hunters and Reindeer herders. Having survived decades of Soviet oppression, the Khanty now face a newer, more ominous
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Generation @  The western world embarks on what we tend to call The @ Generation. What will this group of citizens miss and what will gain? Here are some images of who they are.
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Assignment USA  Whether in protest or celebration,in the heartland or along the border,Todd Bigelow catches glimpses intothe lives of everyday Americans-those who when knitted togetherdefine the fabric of America.
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Ft. Worth Stock Show  Founded in 1896, the Southwestern Exhibition and Livestock Show of Ft. Worth, Texas, features the world's original rodeo and more than 20,000 head of livestock from America's top herds.
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When Autumn Leaves Start to Fall  As the days grow shorter and Autumn hues descend,
out of doors there is a newfound crispness,
both on the ground and in the air.

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Heart Of The Taliban  The presence of the Taliban is both felt and evident in the city of Kandahar, Afghanistan.
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WTC - Attack and Aftermath  Images from New York, Washington D.C., and around the Nation following the tragic events of September 11th, 2001.
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Horses of Badakhshan
Afghanistan
 Cross the rugged Hindukush Mountains that form the northern border of Afghanistan and Pakistan with Aurora photographer Andrew Council.
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President Bush- Aftermath of 9/11  The President confronts hard choices and a stunned nation.
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World Trade Center Stock  Images of the World Trade Center in New York City, taken before the tragic events of September 11, 2001.
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Exit Huntsville  Every weekday afternoon in Hunstville, Texas, over 150 former inmates walk out from behind prison fences and into freedom, some are met outside while other wait to catch a Greyhound bus.
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Winter Olympics  Get in the spirit of the Winter Olympics! Competition may be fierce but sportsmanship defines the Olympic Games, celebrating it's nineteenth occurance in Salt Lake City on February 8th, 2002.
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Wild America  Step away from civilization and venture into the American Wilderness, regions where nature, wildlife, and the seasons define the landscape and demonstrate the beauty of untamed life.
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Times Square  Explore the changing face of New York City's Times Square with a native New Yorker as your guide.
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Seeds of Peace  The Seeds of Peace internationally recognized program aims at empowering young leaders from regions of conflict with the leadership skills required to advance reconciliation and coexistence. The model begins at the International Camp in Maine and continues through follow-up programming with international youth conferences, regional workshops, educational and professional opportunities, and an adult educator program. This comprehensive system allows participants to develop empathy, respect, and confidence as well as leadership, communication and negotiation skills — all critical components that will facilitate peaceful coexistence for the next generation.
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Maya Quest  Travel through Belize, Guatemala and the Yucatan Peninsula, explore ancient ruins, attend a religious festival and meet many modern-day Maya.
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Shark Hunt  Many people fear sharks. Some choose to chase them down, fish them in and kill 'em.
Humans get the last laugh on a shark hunt off the coast of Montauk, Long Island.
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County Fairs  Take a stroll through an amalgam of prize vegetables, fried dough and carnival rides.
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Fleeing Afghanistan  There are over two million Afghan refugees in Iran and Pakistan, making Afghans the largest single refugee group in the world. Join Chris as he bears witness to this displaced population at a camp in Pakistan nea
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Speed Week  Experience land racing at its best on the pure white crystalline salt plains during Bonneville's "Speed Week".
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Stranger than Fiction  We are still piecing it together, but there is something quite odd about this collection of images.
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Rattlesnake Roundup  Join Aurora photographer Chris Hamilton as he documents the annual Rattlesnake Roundup in Sweetwater, Texas - the largest Rattlesnake Roundup in the world.
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Oklahoma National Memorial  Where the Murrah Federal building once stood, a National Memorial has been erected to honor the memories of men, women and children killed in the bombing of April 19, 1995.
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Dogon Climbing  Using tree bark as rope, the Dogon of Mali climb cliffs more than 800 feet high.
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Sign Language  Dominating the landscape in the name of explanation, attention, or direction, signs communicate ideas and demand that on-lookers take notice.
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Tiji festival in the Kingdom of Mustang  
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Mustang  Venture into a remote corner of Nepal where centuries-old Buddhist traditions lie preserved in the isolated mountain villages of a region called Mustang.
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Anaconda  Anacondas are aquatic boa inhabiting the swamps and rivers of the dense forests of tropical South America. How do you catch one?
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Dogon Dama Dance  KEEPERS OF THE MASKS
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Cuba  Buscas algo un poco diferente? Visite una isla carribeana lleno de historia, musica y corazon.
Journey to Cuba!
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Drug Tourism in Peru  The shamans of Amazonia have used Ayahuasca, Salvia divinorum, for thousands of years to heal physical, emotional, and psychological conditions. Today western tourists visit isolated regions of South America to experience the powerful hallucinogenic, as well as its therapeutic affects.
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Liver Transplant  Aurora photographer Chris Anderson documents a liver transplant at the N.Y.U. Medical Center. More than 17,000 people are on the waiting list for liver transplants in the United States.
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Polar Bear Hunt  Join an Aurora photographer as he explores Greenland with Inuit hunters.
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African Wildlife & Water  Water and wildlife are never far apart. Adrian Bailey has spent countless hours following and photographing African beasts and over those years has documented the water-wildlife relationship.
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Police Brutality  Meet the families of the victims of police brutality and bear witness to how they have been affected by this social menace.
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Nature's Medicine  When illness strikes, millions of us turn to nature's medicine cabinet for relief. Join Lynn Johnson as she explores how healing plants, human touch, meditation and a holistic approach to health can maintain the body,
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Death Row in Texas  Texas has the highest execution rate in the United States. Since the death penalty was reinstated in 1976, Texas has performed a total of 241 executions by lethal injection.
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The Pan American Highway  Hit the road with Melissa as she travels through Mexico, Peru and Chile along the Pan American Highway.
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Throwing Stones  Palestinian youths and Israeli troops clash daily in the Gaza Strip. The Palestinian boys throw stones and Molotov cocktails. The highly trained Israeli troops retaliate with tear gas and gunfire.
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Habitat for Humanity  Habitat for Humanity helps low-income families, "achieve a simple, decent place to live through no-interest mortgages and sweat equity hours."
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Silent Company  Aurora photographer Randy Olson has documented the life of the Whitmans, a family in which four members all tested positive for HIV. This is their story, and albeit an undeniably tragic one, on a deeper level it is te
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Dancing on Air  Come one come all. For a one time performance the Bandaloop Troupe dances on air 2,500 vertical feet up a cliffside in Yosemite National Park.
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Robert Taylor Projects  These are the Robert Taylor Homes on Chicago's south side. Opened in 1962 to great fanfare - the Taylor homes were considered a utopian vision of urban housing - and ended up a symbol of racism and urban degradation.
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Exploring Inner Maine  Inner Maine, when explored, reveals a patchwork quilt of beauty, ruggedness, and stalwart independence.
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Finding Balance: Parks & People  Millions of Americans visit our national parks annually. Most are unaware that with each visit they affect the balance between the preservation and the destruction of the very land, water, and hist
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Meat Packing District  In Manhattan's Meat Packing District, the theme changes every night but generally a mix of fetish, drag queens, and goth rockers take the streets and clubs.
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Conservatory Garden  A botantical oasis in the middle of Manhattan
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Congo Adventure  The first Westerners in years venture down the Chinko River.
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Perfume  Ever wonder where all those exotic smells and fragrances come from? Click and find out
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Jack's Life: A World in Two Blocks  Jack is over 60, and living in Gilbert, Arkansas (pop. 43) with Down's syndrome.
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Feeding the Planet  Will we continue to produce enough food to feed thebillions living on this planet?
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The Basket Maker  Steve Zeh backs his hand crafted baskets with years oftraining and tradition
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Brethren Family  The Protiva family escaped urban angst by moving to Peace Valley, Missouri and adopting a conservative Christian lifestyle.
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